Skip to main content
placeholder image

Emotions and consciousness

Chapter


Abstract


  • It can seem obvious that there are natural connections

    between emotional states of mind, such as

    being angry or fearful, and their conscious properties,

    such as feeling anger and fear. However, there

    is currently no agreed-on or settled understanding of

    the precise relationships between these phenomena.

    There are a number of reasons for this. A major factor

    is the plethora of competing accounts about the

    nature of emotions, which promote different views

    about the importance of consciousness, and specific

    types of consciousness, for understanding the emotions.

    To give a sense of these options, this entry will

    describe features of the purer forms of intellectual

    and experiential accounts.

    Emotions have been variously identified with

    judgments or feelings of bodily changes, and they are

    sometimes thought of as more structurally complex

    mental states that, at least ordinarily, involve the

    former as elementary constituents. Whether consciousness

    is necessary or matters critically for understanding

    emotion, and which variety or form matters

    depends on the account of the emotions adopted.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Hutto, D. (2013). Emotions and consciousness. In H. Pashler (Eds.), Encyclopedia of the Mind (pp. 320-321). Thousand Oaks, United States: Sage Publications Inc.

Book Title


  • Encyclopedia of the Mind

Start Page


  • 320

End Page


  • 321

Abstract


  • It can seem obvious that there are natural connections

    between emotional states of mind, such as

    being angry or fearful, and their conscious properties,

    such as feeling anger and fear. However, there

    is currently no agreed-on or settled understanding of

    the precise relationships between these phenomena.

    There are a number of reasons for this. A major factor

    is the plethora of competing accounts about the

    nature of emotions, which promote different views

    about the importance of consciousness, and specific

    types of consciousness, for understanding the emotions.

    To give a sense of these options, this entry will

    describe features of the purer forms of intellectual

    and experiential accounts.

    Emotions have been variously identified with

    judgments or feelings of bodily changes, and they are

    sometimes thought of as more structurally complex

    mental states that, at least ordinarily, involve the

    former as elementary constituents. Whether consciousness

    is necessary or matters critically for understanding

    emotion, and which variety or form matters

    depends on the account of the emotions adopted.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Hutto, D. (2013). Emotions and consciousness. In H. Pashler (Eds.), Encyclopedia of the Mind (pp. 320-321). Thousand Oaks, United States: Sage Publications Inc.

Book Title


  • Encyclopedia of the Mind

Start Page


  • 320

End Page


  • 321