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Palaeoclimate from Corals

Chapter


Abstract


  • Ocean–atmosphere interactions in the tropics have farreaching

    consequences for climate variability across the

    globe. The tropics drive heat transfer to the poles, and tropical

    inter-annual oscillations such as the El Niño-Southern

    Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian Ocean dipole (IOD), via

    atmospheric teleconnections, affect rainfall patterns and

    climate conditions in areas far beyond the tropics

    (Ropelewski and Halpert, 1987), causing major socioeconomic

    impacts. Monitoring efforts have focused on

    improving observations and understanding of tropical climate

    variability, with the view to refining modeling of the

    tropical oceans and atmosphere. Despite these efforts, most

    instrumental records span only the past few decades and do

    not capture the full range of tropical climate variability, limiting

    our ability to model future changes. Coral paleoclimatology

    offers the prospect to extend instrumental records of

    tropical climate variability and can provide unique insights

    into tropical ocean–atmosphere interactions.

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • McGregor, H. V. (2011). Palaeoclimate from Corals. In D. Hopley (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Modern Coral Reefs (pp. 777-785). Netherlands: Springer.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/1170

Book Title


  • Encyclopedia of Modern Coral Reefs

Start Page


  • 777

End Page


  • 785

Abstract


  • Ocean–atmosphere interactions in the tropics have farreaching

    consequences for climate variability across the

    globe. The tropics drive heat transfer to the poles, and tropical

    inter-annual oscillations such as the El Niño-Southern

    Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian Ocean dipole (IOD), via

    atmospheric teleconnections, affect rainfall patterns and

    climate conditions in areas far beyond the tropics

    (Ropelewski and Halpert, 1987), causing major socioeconomic

    impacts. Monitoring efforts have focused on

    improving observations and understanding of tropical climate

    variability, with the view to refining modeling of the

    tropical oceans and atmosphere. Despite these efforts, most

    instrumental records span only the past few decades and do

    not capture the full range of tropical climate variability, limiting

    our ability to model future changes. Coral paleoclimatology

    offers the prospect to extend instrumental records of

    tropical climate variability and can provide unique insights

    into tropical ocean–atmosphere interactions.

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • McGregor, H. V. (2011). Palaeoclimate from Corals. In D. Hopley (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Modern Coral Reefs (pp. 777-785). Netherlands: Springer.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/1170

Book Title


  • Encyclopedia of Modern Coral Reefs

Start Page


  • 777

End Page


  • 785