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Iodine status similarly suboptimal in Australian women who have desirable salt intakes compared to those with excessive intakes

Journal Article


Abstract


  • To the Editor:

    The World Health Organization (WHO) identifies salt reduction as a best buy, in terms of a cost–benefit analysis for the prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases. Global targets aim for a 30% relative reduction in mean population intake of salt or sodium with an overarching target of <5 g/d by 2025 [1]. At the same time as population salt reduction is recommended, there is concern that iodine deficiency may reemerge because many countries have adopted universal salt iodization (USI) to eliminate iodine-deficiency disorders. Iodine-deficiency disorders remain a major public health concern, resulting in impaired cognitive development and function, hypothyroidism, congenital abnormalities, cretinism, or endemic goitre [2]. The WHO endorses universal salt iodization whereby all salt for human and animal consumption is iodized (including salt for processed foods) and reaffirms that the public health goals of reducing salt and increasing iodine intake through salt iodization are compatible as the concentration of iodine in salt can be adjusted upward as salt intake is reduced [3].

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Charlton, K., Land, M., Ma, G. & Yeatman, H. (2014). Iodine status similarly suboptimal in Australian women who have desirable salt intakes compared to those with excessive intakes. Nutrition, 30 (2), 234-235.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84891156655

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/1346

Number Of Pages


  • 1

Start Page


  • 234

End Page


  • 235

Volume


  • 30

Issue


  • 2

Abstract


  • To the Editor:

    The World Health Organization (WHO) identifies salt reduction as a best buy, in terms of a cost–benefit analysis for the prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases. Global targets aim for a 30% relative reduction in mean population intake of salt or sodium with an overarching target of <5 g/d by 2025 [1]. At the same time as population salt reduction is recommended, there is concern that iodine deficiency may reemerge because many countries have adopted universal salt iodization (USI) to eliminate iodine-deficiency disorders. Iodine-deficiency disorders remain a major public health concern, resulting in impaired cognitive development and function, hypothyroidism, congenital abnormalities, cretinism, or endemic goitre [2]. The WHO endorses universal salt iodization whereby all salt for human and animal consumption is iodized (including salt for processed foods) and reaffirms that the public health goals of reducing salt and increasing iodine intake through salt iodization are compatible as the concentration of iodine in salt can be adjusted upward as salt intake is reduced [3].

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Charlton, K., Land, M., Ma, G. & Yeatman, H. (2014). Iodine status similarly suboptimal in Australian women who have desirable salt intakes compared to those with excessive intakes. Nutrition, 30 (2), 234-235.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84891156655

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/1346

Number Of Pages


  • 1

Start Page


  • 234

End Page


  • 235

Volume


  • 30

Issue


  • 2