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Characterising poly (vinyl chloride)/Aliquat 336 polymer inclusion membranes: Evidence of phase separation and its role in metal extraction

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • The miscibility of the base polymer poly (vinyl chloride) (PVC) and the extractant Aliquat 336 in polymer

    inclusion membranes (PIMs) was investigated by characterisation of thermal transitions using differential

    scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The extractions of Cd (II) and Zn

    (II) using PVC/Aliquat 336 PIMs with different base polymer/extractant composition and different extraction

    temperature were also investigated. Changes in the PIM’s heat capacity measured by DSC were small,

    thus, could only be used to determine the glass transition temperature (Tg) of PIMs with low Aliquat 336

    content. On the other hand, DMA results clearly identify the (Tg) and melting temperature (Tm) of separate

    PVC and Aliquat 336 rich phases in the PIMs. Results reported here indicate that the PVC/Aliquat 336

    PIMs are phase separated. This phase separation has important implications to the extraction of target

    metallic ions by PIMs. Extraction studies showed that the extraction of metallic ions occurred only when

    the proportion of Aliquat 336 in PIMs was about 30 wt.% or higher. The extraction rate could be improved

    by increasing the temperature and thus the target ion transport in the Aliquat 336 phase.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Abdul-Halim, N., Whitten, P. G. & Nghiem, L. D. (2013). Characterising poly (vinyl chloride)/Aliquat 336 polymer inclusion membranes: Evidence of phase separation and its role in metal extraction. Separation and Purification Technology, 119 14-18.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84884626157

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2391&context=eispapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/eispapers/1382

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 4

Start Page


  • 14

End Page


  • 18

Volume


  • 119

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • The miscibility of the base polymer poly (vinyl chloride) (PVC) and the extractant Aliquat 336 in polymer

    inclusion membranes (PIMs) was investigated by characterisation of thermal transitions using differential

    scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The extractions of Cd (II) and Zn

    (II) using PVC/Aliquat 336 PIMs with different base polymer/extractant composition and different extraction

    temperature were also investigated. Changes in the PIM’s heat capacity measured by DSC were small,

    thus, could only be used to determine the glass transition temperature (Tg) of PIMs with low Aliquat 336

    content. On the other hand, DMA results clearly identify the (Tg) and melting temperature (Tm) of separate

    PVC and Aliquat 336 rich phases in the PIMs. Results reported here indicate that the PVC/Aliquat 336

    PIMs are phase separated. This phase separation has important implications to the extraction of target

    metallic ions by PIMs. Extraction studies showed that the extraction of metallic ions occurred only when

    the proportion of Aliquat 336 in PIMs was about 30 wt.% or higher. The extraction rate could be improved

    by increasing the temperature and thus the target ion transport in the Aliquat 336 phase.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Abdul-Halim, N., Whitten, P. G. & Nghiem, L. D. (2013). Characterising poly (vinyl chloride)/Aliquat 336 polymer inclusion membranes: Evidence of phase separation and its role in metal extraction. Separation and Purification Technology, 119 14-18.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84884626157

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2391&context=eispapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/eispapers/1382

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 4

Start Page


  • 14

End Page


  • 18

Volume


  • 119

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom