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Self and world

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Self and World is an attempt to provide and assess arguments for materialism

    about self-consciousness. This is not an ontological thesis, rather it is the

    claim that in some sense ‘‘self-consciousness requires awareness of oneself qua

    subject as shaped, located and solid’’ (p. 117). Importantly, the qualifying

    ‘some sense’ leaves room for unpacking in terms of a conception of oneself as

    a physical object or merely an intuitive awareness of oneself as such. Taking

    note of this crucial distinction, which he uses to good effect, Cassam’s book

    makes a sober, sustained case for this thesis by relying on three complementary

    arguments which strike from several directions at once. Following in the

    footsteps of Kant and Strawson, these arguments, which comprise the three

    central chapters of the book, are all transcendental in form.

Publication Date


  • 1998

Citation


  • Hutto, D. (1998). Self and world. Philosophical Books, 39 (3), 184-186.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1787&context=lhapapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/782

Number Of Pages


  • 2

Start Page


  • 184

End Page


  • 186

Volume


  • 39

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • http://www.academia.edu/650561/Review_of_Self_and_World._Quassim_Cassam._Oxford_University_Press._1997

Abstract


  • Self and World is an attempt to provide and assess arguments for materialism

    about self-consciousness. This is not an ontological thesis, rather it is the

    claim that in some sense ‘‘self-consciousness requires awareness of oneself qua

    subject as shaped, located and solid’’ (p. 117). Importantly, the qualifying

    ‘some sense’ leaves room for unpacking in terms of a conception of oneself as

    a physical object or merely an intuitive awareness of oneself as such. Taking

    note of this crucial distinction, which he uses to good effect, Cassam’s book

    makes a sober, sustained case for this thesis by relying on three complementary

    arguments which strike from several directions at once. Following in the

    footsteps of Kant and Strawson, these arguments, which comprise the three

    central chapters of the book, are all transcendental in form.

Publication Date


  • 1998

Citation


  • Hutto, D. (1998). Self and world. Philosophical Books, 39 (3), 184-186.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1787&context=lhapapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/782

Number Of Pages


  • 2

Start Page


  • 184

End Page


  • 186

Volume


  • 39

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • http://www.academia.edu/650561/Review_of_Self_and_World._Quassim_Cassam._Oxford_University_Press._1997