Skip to main content
placeholder image

Induced pluripotent stem cells as tools for disease modelling and drug discovery in Alzheimer’s disease

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • The use of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), whereby a patient’s

    somatic cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state by the forced

    expression of a defined set of transcription factors, has the potential

    to enable in vitro disease modelling and be used for drug discovery

    programs. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative

    brain disorder that leads to a decline in memory and cognition. Fibroblasts

    were taken from AD patients (or non-AD controls) and cultured under

    specific conditions to generate iPSCs which were then provided with

    growth factors to allow differentiation into neurons. While AD-iPSCs

    were morphologically indistinguishable from control-iPSCs, differentiated

    cells showed differing responses to cellular stresses. Since these cells

    are derived from individual patients, the use of iPSCs have provided

    novel insights into disease pathogenesis, providing information on an

    individual’s variations in the disease process and their cellular response

    to drugs. Using this system we have identified a number of drugs that

    protect AD neurons against the damaging effects of oxidative stress.

Authors


  •   Ooi, Lezanne
  •   Muench, G (external author)
  •   Sidhu, Kuldip (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Ooi, L., Muench, G. & Sidhu, K. (2013). Induced pluripotent stem cells as tools for disease modelling and drug discovery in Alzheimer’s disease. 33rd Meeting of the Australian Neuroscience Society: Program, Abstracts & List of Registrants (pp. 190-190). Australia: ANS.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/913

Start Page


  • 190

End Page


  • 190

Place Of Publication


  • Australia

Abstract


  • The use of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), whereby a patient’s

    somatic cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state by the forced

    expression of a defined set of transcription factors, has the potential

    to enable in vitro disease modelling and be used for drug discovery

    programs. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative

    brain disorder that leads to a decline in memory and cognition. Fibroblasts

    were taken from AD patients (or non-AD controls) and cultured under

    specific conditions to generate iPSCs which were then provided with

    growth factors to allow differentiation into neurons. While AD-iPSCs

    were morphologically indistinguishable from control-iPSCs, differentiated

    cells showed differing responses to cellular stresses. Since these cells

    are derived from individual patients, the use of iPSCs have provided

    novel insights into disease pathogenesis, providing information on an

    individual’s variations in the disease process and their cellular response

    to drugs. Using this system we have identified a number of drugs that

    protect AD neurons against the damaging effects of oxidative stress.

Authors


  •   Ooi, Lezanne
  •   Muench, G (external author)
  •   Sidhu, Kuldip (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Ooi, L., Muench, G. & Sidhu, K. (2013). Induced pluripotent stem cells as tools for disease modelling and drug discovery in Alzheimer’s disease. 33rd Meeting of the Australian Neuroscience Society: Program, Abstracts & List of Registrants (pp. 190-190). Australia: ANS.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/913

Start Page


  • 190

End Page


  • 190

Place Of Publication


  • Australia