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Tracking physical activity and sedentary behavior in childhood: a systematic review

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Context:

    To date, no reviews have investigated the evidence of tracking of physical activity and

    sedentary behavior specifically during early childhood (aged 0–5.9 years) or from early childhood to

    middle childhood (aged 6–12 years). It is important to review the evidence of tracking of these

    behaviors to determine their stability during the foundational early years of life.

    Evidence acquisition:

    A literature search of studies was conducted in seven electronic databases

    (January 1980 to April 2012). Studies were compared on methodologic quality and evidence of

    tracking of physical activity or sedentary behavior. Tracking was defined as the stability (or relative

    ranking within a cohort) of behaviors, such as physical activity and sedentary behavior, over time.

    Evidence synthesis:

    Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. All studies reporting physical

    activity outcomes had high methodologic quality; 71% of studies reporting sedentary behavior

    outcomes had high methodologic quality. Of the tracking coefficients for physical activity, 4% were

    large, 60% were moderate, and 36% were small. Of the tracking coefficients for sedentary behavior,

    33% were large, 50% were moderate, and 17% were small. Overall, there was evidence of moderate

    tracking of physical activity during early childhood, and from early childhood to middle childhood,

    and of moderate-to-large tracking of sedentary behavior during early childhood and from early

    childhood to middle childhood.

    Conclusions:

    This review highlights the importance of establishing recommended levels of physical

    activity and sedentary behavior during the early years of life. Based on this review, the following

    recommendations are made: (1) early childhood should be targeted as a critical time to promote

    healthy lifestyle behaviors through methodologically sound prevention studies; and (2) future

    tracking studies should assess a broad range of sedentary behaviors using objective measures.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Jones, R. A., Hinkley, T., Okely, A. D. & Salmon, J. (2013). Tracking physical activity and sedentary behavior in childhood: a systematic review. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 44 (6), 651-658.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84877880056

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/231

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 7

Start Page


  • 651

End Page


  • 658

Volume


  • 44

Issue


  • 6

Place Of Publication


  • United States

Abstract


  • Context:

    To date, no reviews have investigated the evidence of tracking of physical activity and

    sedentary behavior specifically during early childhood (aged 0–5.9 years) or from early childhood to

    middle childhood (aged 6–12 years). It is important to review the evidence of tracking of these

    behaviors to determine their stability during the foundational early years of life.

    Evidence acquisition:

    A literature search of studies was conducted in seven electronic databases

    (January 1980 to April 2012). Studies were compared on methodologic quality and evidence of

    tracking of physical activity or sedentary behavior. Tracking was defined as the stability (or relative

    ranking within a cohort) of behaviors, such as physical activity and sedentary behavior, over time.

    Evidence synthesis:

    Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. All studies reporting physical

    activity outcomes had high methodologic quality; 71% of studies reporting sedentary behavior

    outcomes had high methodologic quality. Of the tracking coefficients for physical activity, 4% were

    large, 60% were moderate, and 36% were small. Of the tracking coefficients for sedentary behavior,

    33% were large, 50% were moderate, and 17% were small. Overall, there was evidence of moderate

    tracking of physical activity during early childhood, and from early childhood to middle childhood,

    and of moderate-to-large tracking of sedentary behavior during early childhood and from early

    childhood to middle childhood.

    Conclusions:

    This review highlights the importance of establishing recommended levels of physical

    activity and sedentary behavior during the early years of life. Based on this review, the following

    recommendations are made: (1) early childhood should be targeted as a critical time to promote

    healthy lifestyle behaviors through methodologically sound prevention studies; and (2) future

    tracking studies should assess a broad range of sedentary behaviors using objective measures.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Jones, R. A., Hinkley, T., Okely, A. D. & Salmon, J. (2013). Tracking physical activity and sedentary behavior in childhood: a systematic review. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 44 (6), 651-658.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84877880056

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/231

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 7

Start Page


  • 651

End Page


  • 658

Volume


  • 44

Issue


  • 6

Place Of Publication


  • United States