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Introduction: ways of knowing about human rights in Asia

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) was adopted on 10 December

    1948 by the United Nations General Assembly. We have thus seen 65 years of the

    international project of addressing human rights issues at a global level through the

    United Nations and associated organisations. Human rights occupy a paradoxical place

    in international politics. Human rights treaties address the most intimate issues of personal

    freedom, autonomy and self-determination, but the institutions developed for the

    promotion of human rights operate at a global level seemingly distanced from this intimate

    and individual scale. In human rights advocacy there is thus constant mediation

    between the individual, the local, the national, the regional and the global. In this

    collection of essays we consider human rights issues at the regional level – in some

    East and Southeast Asian nations and in their associated national and diasporic

    communities.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Mackie, V. C. (2013). Introduction: ways of knowing about human rights in Asia. Asian Studies Review, 37 (3), 293-301.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84884144838

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1854&context=lhapapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/849

Number Of Pages


  • 8

Start Page


  • 293

End Page


  • 301

Volume


  • 37

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10357823.2013.811780

Abstract


  • The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) was adopted on 10 December

    1948 by the United Nations General Assembly. We have thus seen 65 years of the

    international project of addressing human rights issues at a global level through the

    United Nations and associated organisations. Human rights occupy a paradoxical place

    in international politics. Human rights treaties address the most intimate issues of personal

    freedom, autonomy and self-determination, but the institutions developed for the

    promotion of human rights operate at a global level seemingly distanced from this intimate

    and individual scale. In human rights advocacy there is thus constant mediation

    between the individual, the local, the national, the regional and the global. In this

    collection of essays we consider human rights issues at the regional level – in some

    East and Southeast Asian nations and in their associated national and diasporic

    communities.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Mackie, V. C. (2013). Introduction: ways of knowing about human rights in Asia. Asian Studies Review, 37 (3), 293-301.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84884144838

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1854&context=lhapapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/849

Number Of Pages


  • 8

Start Page


  • 293

End Page


  • 301

Volume


  • 37

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10357823.2013.811780