Location and tracking of mobile devices: Überveillance stalks the streets

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • During the last decade, location-tracking and monitoring applications have proliferated, in mobile cellular and wireless data networks, and through self-reporting by applications running in smartphones that are equipped with onboard global positioning system (GPS) chipsets. It is now possible to locate a smartphone user's location not merely to a cell, but to a small area within it. Innovators have been quick to capitalise on these location-based technologies for commercial purposes, and have gained access to a great deal of sensitive personal data in the process. In addition, law enforcement utilises these technologies, can do so inexpensively and hence can track many more people. Moreover, these agencies seek the power to conduct tracking covertly, and without a judicial warrant. This article investigates the dimensions of the problem of people-tracking through the devices that they carry. Location surveillance has very serious negative implications for individuals, yet there are very limited safeguards. It is incumbent on legislatures to address these problems, through both domestic laws and multilateral processes.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Michael, K. & Clarke, R. (2013). Location and tracking of mobile devices: Überveillance stalks the streets. Computer Law and Security Review: the International Journal of Technology Law and Practice, 29 (3), 216-228.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84877770829

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3583&context=eispapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/eispapers/2574

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 12

Start Page


  • 216

End Page


  • 228

Volume


  • 29

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • During the last decade, location-tracking and monitoring applications have proliferated, in mobile cellular and wireless data networks, and through self-reporting by applications running in smartphones that are equipped with onboard global positioning system (GPS) chipsets. It is now possible to locate a smartphone user's location not merely to a cell, but to a small area within it. Innovators have been quick to capitalise on these location-based technologies for commercial purposes, and have gained access to a great deal of sensitive personal data in the process. In addition, law enforcement utilises these technologies, can do so inexpensively and hence can track many more people. Moreover, these agencies seek the power to conduct tracking covertly, and without a judicial warrant. This article investigates the dimensions of the problem of people-tracking through the devices that they carry. Location surveillance has very serious negative implications for individuals, yet there are very limited safeguards. It is incumbent on legislatures to address these problems, through both domestic laws and multilateral processes.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Michael, K. & Clarke, R. (2013). Location and tracking of mobile devices: Überveillance stalks the streets. Computer Law and Security Review: the International Journal of Technology Law and Practice, 29 (3), 216-228.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84877770829

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3583&context=eispapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/eispapers/2574

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 12

Start Page


  • 216

End Page


  • 228

Volume


  • 29

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom