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Social systems in habitat-specialist reef fishes: key concepts in evolutionary ecology

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • A major focus in evolutionary ecology lies in explaining the evolution and maintenance of social systems. Although most theoretical formulations

    of social system evolution were initially inspired by studies of birds, mammals, and insects, incorporating a wider taxonomic perspective

    is important for testing deeply entrenched theory. Here, we review the contribution of studies of habitat-specialist coral reef fishes to our understanding

    of the evolutionary ecology of animal social systems. These fishes are ecologically similar but display remarkable variation in mating

    systems, social organization, and sex allocation strategies. By reviewing recent research, we demonstrate their amenability for experimental

    testing of key concepts in social evolution and for generating novel insights, including the ultimate reasons for female reproductive suppression,

    group living, and bidirectional sex change. Habitat-specialist reef fishes are a tried and tested group of model organisms for advancing our

    understanding of the evolution and ecology of social systems in animals.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Wong, M. Y.L. & Buston, P. M. (2013). Social systems in habitat-specialist reef fishes: key concepts in evolutionary ecology. Bioscience, 63 (6), 453-463.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84880222476

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1626&context=smhpapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/613

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 10

Start Page


  • 453

End Page


  • 463

Volume


  • 63

Issue


  • 6

Place Of Publication


  • United States

Abstract


  • A major focus in evolutionary ecology lies in explaining the evolution and maintenance of social systems. Although most theoretical formulations

    of social system evolution were initially inspired by studies of birds, mammals, and insects, incorporating a wider taxonomic perspective

    is important for testing deeply entrenched theory. Here, we review the contribution of studies of habitat-specialist coral reef fishes to our understanding

    of the evolutionary ecology of animal social systems. These fishes are ecologically similar but display remarkable variation in mating

    systems, social organization, and sex allocation strategies. By reviewing recent research, we demonstrate their amenability for experimental

    testing of key concepts in social evolution and for generating novel insights, including the ultimate reasons for female reproductive suppression,

    group living, and bidirectional sex change. Habitat-specialist reef fishes are a tried and tested group of model organisms for advancing our

    understanding of the evolution and ecology of social systems in animals.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Wong, M. Y.L. & Buston, P. M. (2013). Social systems in habitat-specialist reef fishes: key concepts in evolutionary ecology. Bioscience, 63 (6), 453-463.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84880222476

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1626&context=smhpapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/613

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 10

Start Page


  • 453

End Page


  • 463

Volume


  • 63

Issue


  • 6

Place Of Publication


  • United States