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Horn of troubles: understanding and addressing the Somali “piracy” phenomenon

Chapter


Abstract


  • Recent years have witnessed an unprecedented surge in piratical attacks off the

    Horn of Africa. While attacks against shipping in the northwestern Indian Ocean

    are by no means a new phenomenon, the scale and scope of recent attacks, predominantly

    attributed to Somali "pirates," has made these waters comfortably the

    most dangerous in the world and has imperiled key sea-lanes vital to global maritime

    commerce.1 Although these developments have spurred the international

    community to respond through a range of measures, including most saliently the

    deployment of warships to the region from a diverse array of navies in order to

    conduct counterpiracy patrols, piratical attacks have persisted and now pose a

    major threat to shipping across a broad swath of the Indian Ocean.

    In this chapter we provide a critical assessment of recent developments off the

    Horn of Africa. We outline the rise in maritime insecurity off the Horn of Africa

    and assess a number of the key drivers associated with the rise of Somali piracy.

    We then examine international responses to the problem, including relevant UN

    Security Council resolutions and military responses as well as preventative measures

    on the part of the shipping industry. In the latter part of the chapter we provide

    an analysis of the international legal framework for dealing with piracy and

    criminal justice cooperation issues arising from Somali piracy as well as some of

    the emerging legal developments designed to address deficiencies in bringing the

    pirates to justice and tackling the problem of maritime insecurity off the Horn of

    Africa. Finally, we offer concluding thoughts and suggest that without addressing

    fundamental root causes on land in Somalia, piracy off the Horn of Africa is likely

    to prove an enduring concern.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • C. H. Schofield & R. M. Warner, 'Horn of troubles: understanding and addressing the Somali “piracy” phenomenon' in J. Garofano & A. J. Dew(ed), Deep Currents and Rising Tides: The Indian Ocean and International Security (2013) 49-80.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9781589019676

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/748

Book Title


  • Deep Currents and Rising Tides: The Indian Ocean and International Security

Start Page


  • 49

End Page


  • 80

Place Of Publication


  • Washington, DC

Abstract


  • Recent years have witnessed an unprecedented surge in piratical attacks off the

    Horn of Africa. While attacks against shipping in the northwestern Indian Ocean

    are by no means a new phenomenon, the scale and scope of recent attacks, predominantly

    attributed to Somali "pirates," has made these waters comfortably the

    most dangerous in the world and has imperiled key sea-lanes vital to global maritime

    commerce.1 Although these developments have spurred the international

    community to respond through a range of measures, including most saliently the

    deployment of warships to the region from a diverse array of navies in order to

    conduct counterpiracy patrols, piratical attacks have persisted and now pose a

    major threat to shipping across a broad swath of the Indian Ocean.

    In this chapter we provide a critical assessment of recent developments off the

    Horn of Africa. We outline the rise in maritime insecurity off the Horn of Africa

    and assess a number of the key drivers associated with the rise of Somali piracy.

    We then examine international responses to the problem, including relevant UN

    Security Council resolutions and military responses as well as preventative measures

    on the part of the shipping industry. In the latter part of the chapter we provide

    an analysis of the international legal framework for dealing with piracy and

    criminal justice cooperation issues arising from Somali piracy as well as some of

    the emerging legal developments designed to address deficiencies in bringing the

    pirates to justice and tackling the problem of maritime insecurity off the Horn of

    Africa. Finally, we offer concluding thoughts and suggest that without addressing

    fundamental root causes on land in Somalia, piracy off the Horn of Africa is likely

    to prove an enduring concern.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • C. H. Schofield & R. M. Warner, 'Horn of troubles: understanding and addressing the Somali “piracy” phenomenon' in J. Garofano & A. J. Dew(ed), Deep Currents and Rising Tides: The Indian Ocean and International Security (2013) 49-80.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9781589019676

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/748

Book Title


  • Deep Currents and Rising Tides: The Indian Ocean and International Security

Start Page


  • 49

End Page


  • 80

Place Of Publication


  • Washington, DC