Skip to main content
placeholder image

Australia’s seat on the UN Security Council

Chapter


Abstract


  • With 193 member states, five main organs and

    hundreds of subsidiary agencies, the United Nations

    (UN) is the world's largest and best known international

    organisation. The UN has many parts, but at its heart is

    the Security Council (UNSC)-the one body that can

    legally decide, in the interests of international peace

    and security, to wage war on behalf of the collective

    interest of the countries of the world. Its resolutions

    have the force of international law, so participation

    in this body provides an opportunity to deliberate on

    issues of global importance. Five of the fifteen seats

    on the Security Council are permanent, held by the

    United Kingdom, the United States, Russia, China and

    France. The other ten seats are rotated through the

    five blocs of the UN, with the two-year terms being

    staggered so not all blocs have a vacancy every year. In

    October 2012 Australia was elected a member of the

    UNSC for 2013-14. How that happened is the subject

    of this case study.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Edition


  • 3

Citation


  • Hawksley, C. & Georgeou, N. (2013). Australia’s seat on the UN Security Council. In C. Hawksley & N. Georgeou (Eds.), The Globalization of World Politics: Case Studies from Australia, New Zealand and the Asia Pacific (3rd edition) Melbourne: Oxford University Press. (pp. 70-72). Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9780195525663

Book Title


  • The Globalization of World Politics: Case Studies from Australia, New Zealand and the Asia Pacific (3rd edition) Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

Start Page


  • 70

End Page


  • 72

Place Of Publication


  • Melbourne

Abstract


  • With 193 member states, five main organs and

    hundreds of subsidiary agencies, the United Nations

    (UN) is the world's largest and best known international

    organisation. The UN has many parts, but at its heart is

    the Security Council (UNSC)-the one body that can

    legally decide, in the interests of international peace

    and security, to wage war on behalf of the collective

    interest of the countries of the world. Its resolutions

    have the force of international law, so participation

    in this body provides an opportunity to deliberate on

    issues of global importance. Five of the fifteen seats

    on the Security Council are permanent, held by the

    United Kingdom, the United States, Russia, China and

    France. The other ten seats are rotated through the

    five blocs of the UN, with the two-year terms being

    staggered so not all blocs have a vacancy every year. In

    October 2012 Australia was elected a member of the

    UNSC for 2013-14. How that happened is the subject

    of this case study.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Edition


  • 3

Citation


  • Hawksley, C. & Georgeou, N. (2013). Australia’s seat on the UN Security Council. In C. Hawksley & N. Georgeou (Eds.), The Globalization of World Politics: Case Studies from Australia, New Zealand and the Asia Pacific (3rd edition) Melbourne: Oxford University Press. (pp. 70-72). Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9780195525663

Book Title


  • The Globalization of World Politics: Case Studies from Australia, New Zealand and the Asia Pacific (3rd edition) Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

Start Page


  • 70

End Page


  • 72

Place Of Publication


  • Melbourne