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Sovereignty and Intervention in Southeast Asia

Chapter


Abstract


  • The states of the Asia Pacific largely inherited their

    borders and administrative systems from the retreating

    empires of Britain and France. Along with 'the state',

    the norms of Westphalian statehood-sovereignty

    and non-intervention-have also become entrenched

    in the Southeast Asian region, in particular through

    the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN).

    One view of globalisation holds that the Westphalian

    order is under threat from failing states, United

    States militarism, a backlash against Western ideas,

    environmental issues and global poverty. This case

    study advances a contrary position. It argues that

    far from fading away, the state remains crucial to

    international society, and that steps are constantly

    being taken to avert the decline of the state through

    peacekeeping. This brief analysis of United Nations

    peace operations in Southeast Asia focuses on

    Cambodia and Timor-Leste (East Timor). It argues

    that restoring, or even creating, sovereignty requires

    direct intervention, and that overturning norms

    of non-intervention, even with consent, assists in

    strengthening state sovereignty.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Edition


  • 3

Citation


  • Hawksley, C. & Georgeou, N. (2013). Sovereignty and Intervention in Southeast Asia. In C. Hawksley & N. Georgeou (Eds.), The Globalization of World Politics: Case Studies from Australia, New Zealand and the Asia Pacific (pp. 5-8). Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9780195525663

Book Title


  • The Globalization of World Politics: Case Studies from Australia, New Zealand and the Asia Pacific

Start Page


  • 5

End Page


  • 8

Place Of Publication


  • Melbourne

Abstract


  • The states of the Asia Pacific largely inherited their

    borders and administrative systems from the retreating

    empires of Britain and France. Along with 'the state',

    the norms of Westphalian statehood-sovereignty

    and non-intervention-have also become entrenched

    in the Southeast Asian region, in particular through

    the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN).

    One view of globalisation holds that the Westphalian

    order is under threat from failing states, United

    States militarism, a backlash against Western ideas,

    environmental issues and global poverty. This case

    study advances a contrary position. It argues that

    far from fading away, the state remains crucial to

    international society, and that steps are constantly

    being taken to avert the decline of the state through

    peacekeeping. This brief analysis of United Nations

    peace operations in Southeast Asia focuses on

    Cambodia and Timor-Leste (East Timor). It argues

    that restoring, or even creating, sovereignty requires

    direct intervention, and that overturning norms

    of non-intervention, even with consent, assists in

    strengthening state sovereignty.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Edition


  • 3

Citation


  • Hawksley, C. & Georgeou, N. (2013). Sovereignty and Intervention in Southeast Asia. In C. Hawksley & N. Georgeou (Eds.), The Globalization of World Politics: Case Studies from Australia, New Zealand and the Asia Pacific (pp. 5-8). Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9780195525663

Book Title


  • The Globalization of World Politics: Case Studies from Australia, New Zealand and the Asia Pacific

Start Page


  • 5

End Page


  • 8

Place Of Publication


  • Melbourne