Book Review Symposium: John Scott Conceptualising the Social World: Principles of Sociological Analysis

Journal Article


Abstract


  • ‘I’m not actually a sociologist’. This common rejoinder resounds around sociology

    departments the world over as academics studying gender or the environment rub

    shoulders with those trained in languages, politics, specific regions, media, migration,

    power, philosophy, race and diaspora, statistics, technology, transport and many more

    specializations all vying for space in shrinking departmental budgets. John Scott’s

    Conceptualising the Social World: Principles of Sociological Analysis, which is both

    monograph and sociology primer, makes some headway in broaching the partisanship

    extant in the discipline. It is at heart a conciliatory piece; the substance of an illustrious

    career spanning subjects abutting the many sides of sociology: social network

    analysis, power and the history of sociology. In many ways this book is a social network

    analysis of sociology itself, without the technical visualizations, identifying

    principal nodes and edges of the discipline and joining them up with others. This is

    perhaps the most satisfying aspect of this book – it reads not only as a handbook but

    also mollifies anxieties about the death of sociology by a thousand disciplinary (or is

    it budget) cuts.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Birtchnell, T. (2013). Book Review Symposium: John Scott Conceptualising the Social World: Principles of Sociological Analysis. Sociology, 47 (1), 190-191.

Number Of Pages


  • 1

Start Page


  • 190

End Page


  • 191

Volume


  • 47

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication


  • http://soc.sagepub.com/content/47/1/193.full.pdf+html?rss=1

Abstract


  • ‘I’m not actually a sociologist’. This common rejoinder resounds around sociology

    departments the world over as academics studying gender or the environment rub

    shoulders with those trained in languages, politics, specific regions, media, migration,

    power, philosophy, race and diaspora, statistics, technology, transport and many more

    specializations all vying for space in shrinking departmental budgets. John Scott’s

    Conceptualising the Social World: Principles of Sociological Analysis, which is both

    monograph and sociology primer, makes some headway in broaching the partisanship

    extant in the discipline. It is at heart a conciliatory piece; the substance of an illustrious

    career spanning subjects abutting the many sides of sociology: social network

    analysis, power and the history of sociology. In many ways this book is a social network

    analysis of sociology itself, without the technical visualizations, identifying

    principal nodes and edges of the discipline and joining them up with others. This is

    perhaps the most satisfying aspect of this book – it reads not only as a handbook but

    also mollifies anxieties about the death of sociology by a thousand disciplinary (or is

    it budget) cuts.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Birtchnell, T. (2013). Book Review Symposium: John Scott Conceptualising the Social World: Principles of Sociological Analysis. Sociology, 47 (1), 190-191.

Number Of Pages


  • 1

Start Page


  • 190

End Page


  • 191

Volume


  • 47

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication


  • http://soc.sagepub.com/content/47/1/193.full.pdf+html?rss=1