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Indigenous studies and the politics of language

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Language use changes over time. In Indigenous contexts, language alters to suit the shifting nature of cultural

    expression as this might fit with Indigenous peoples’ preference or as a consequence of changes to outdated

    and colonial modes of expression. For students studying in the discipline of Indigenous Studies, learning to

    use appropriate terminology in written and oral expression can be a source of anxiety. In this paper, we

    consider how providing insight into the political nature of language can help students to be mindful and to

    understand that systems of naming have a political impact on those being named and those doing the naming.

    This paper reflects the views and experiences of teaching staff at the Indigenous Studies Unit (ISU) in the

    Faculty of Arts at the University of Wollongong. It comes from our teaching experience, and from discussions

    with staff and students over the past few years that have conveyed to us a continuing anxiety about language

    use.

Authors


  •   McGloin, Colleen (external author)
  •   Carlson, Bronwyn (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • McGloin, C. & Carlson, B. (2013). Indigenous studies and the politics of language. Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice, 10 (3), 1-10.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1337&context=jutlp

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/jutlp/vol10/iss1/3

Number Of Pages


  • 9

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 10

Volume


  • 10

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/jutlp/vol10/iss1/3

Abstract


  • Language use changes over time. In Indigenous contexts, language alters to suit the shifting nature of cultural

    expression as this might fit with Indigenous peoples’ preference or as a consequence of changes to outdated

    and colonial modes of expression. For students studying in the discipline of Indigenous Studies, learning to

    use appropriate terminology in written and oral expression can be a source of anxiety. In this paper, we

    consider how providing insight into the political nature of language can help students to be mindful and to

    understand that systems of naming have a political impact on those being named and those doing the naming.

    This paper reflects the views and experiences of teaching staff at the Indigenous Studies Unit (ISU) in the

    Faculty of Arts at the University of Wollongong. It comes from our teaching experience, and from discussions

    with staff and students over the past few years that have conveyed to us a continuing anxiety about language

    use.

Authors


  •   McGloin, Colleen (external author)
  •   Carlson, Bronwyn (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • McGloin, C. & Carlson, B. (2013). Indigenous studies and the politics of language. Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice, 10 (3), 1-10.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1337&context=jutlp

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/jutlp/vol10/iss1/3

Number Of Pages


  • 9

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 10

Volume


  • 10

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/jutlp/vol10/iss1/3