Skip to main content
placeholder image

Holistic processing for other-race faces in Chinese participants occurs for upright but not inverted faces

Journal Article


Download full-text (Open Access)

Abstract


  • Recent evidence suggests stronger holistic processing for own-race faces may underlie

    the own-race advantage in face memory. In previous studies Caucasian participants have

    demonstrated larger holistic processing effects for Caucasian over Asian faces. However,

    Asian participants have consistently shown similar sized effects for both Asian and Cau-

    casian faces. We investigated two proposed explanations for the holistic processing of

    other-race faces by Asian participants: (1) greater other-race exposure, (2) a general global

    processing bias. Holistic processing was tested using the part-whole task. Participants

    were living in predominantly own-race environments and other-race contact was evalu-

    ated. Despite reporting significantly greater contact with own-race than other-race people,

    Chinese participants displayed strong holistic processing for both Asian and Caucasian

    upright faces. In addition, Chinese participants showed no evidence of holistic processing

    for inverted faces arguing against a general global processing bias explanation. Caucasian

    participants, in line with previous studies, displayed stronger holistic processing for Cau-

    casian than Asian upright faces. For inverted faces there were no race-of-face differences.

    These results are used to suggest that Asians may make more general use of face-specific

    mechanisms than Caucasians.

    This Document is Protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All rights reserved. it is reproduced with permission.

Authors


  •   Crookes, Kate (external author)
  •   Favelle, Simone K.
  •   Hayward, William (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Crookes, K., Favelle, S. K. & Hayward, W. (2013). Holistic processing for other-race faces in Chinese participants occurs for upright but not inverted faces. Frontiers in Psychology, 4 (29), 1-9.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84874679035

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1053&context=sspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/54

Number Of Pages


  • 8

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 9

Volume


  • 4

Issue


  • 29

Abstract


  • Recent evidence suggests stronger holistic processing for own-race faces may underlie

    the own-race advantage in face memory. In previous studies Caucasian participants have

    demonstrated larger holistic processing effects for Caucasian over Asian faces. However,

    Asian participants have consistently shown similar sized effects for both Asian and Cau-

    casian faces. We investigated two proposed explanations for the holistic processing of

    other-race faces by Asian participants: (1) greater other-race exposure, (2) a general global

    processing bias. Holistic processing was tested using the part-whole task. Participants

    were living in predominantly own-race environments and other-race contact was evalu-

    ated. Despite reporting significantly greater contact with own-race than other-race people,

    Chinese participants displayed strong holistic processing for both Asian and Caucasian

    upright faces. In addition, Chinese participants showed no evidence of holistic processing

    for inverted faces arguing against a general global processing bias explanation. Caucasian

    participants, in line with previous studies, displayed stronger holistic processing for Cau-

    casian than Asian upright faces. For inverted faces there were no race-of-face differences.

    These results are used to suggest that Asians may make more general use of face-specific

    mechanisms than Caucasians.

    This Document is Protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All rights reserved. it is reproduced with permission.

Authors


  •   Crookes, Kate (external author)
  •   Favelle, Simone K.
  •   Hayward, William (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Crookes, K., Favelle, S. K. & Hayward, W. (2013). Holistic processing for other-race faces in Chinese participants occurs for upright but not inverted faces. Frontiers in Psychology, 4 (29), 1-9.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84874679035

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1053&context=sspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/54

Number Of Pages


  • 8

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 9

Volume


  • 4

Issue


  • 29