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‘I don’t think I’m a boy!’ Social understanding and giftedness in preschoolers

Chapter


Abstract


  • Australian school systems have policies that permit accelerative options to meet

    the needs of students identified with gifted potential. However, practice demonstrates

    that this accelerative option is often negatively regarded by decisionmakers

    and, consequently, is infrequently implemented. Reasons for not allowing

    early entry, for example, focus more on the child's social, emotional or

    physical development than their intellectual readiness. While there is research

    exploring this conundrum, the voice of parents is under-researched. This chapter

    presents the case studies of two four-year-old preschoolers who were purposively

    selected for the study. Both were suitable candidates for early entry, but their

    parents in each case were advised against early entry by preschool personnel.

    These case studies illustrate the complex interplay of social understanding,

    emotional maturity and intellectual precocity in young children. They illustrate

    the need for better training of Early Childhood teachers so that they can appropriately

    respond to the needs of such individuals.

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Vialle, W. (2012). ‘I don’t think I’m a boy!’ Social understanding and giftedness in preschoolers. In H. Stoeger, A. Aljughaiman & B. Harder (Eds.), Talent development and excellence (pp. 117-134). Berlin: LIT-Verlag.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/95

Book Title


  • Talent development and excellence

Start Page


  • 117

End Page


  • 134

Abstract


  • Australian school systems have policies that permit accelerative options to meet

    the needs of students identified with gifted potential. However, practice demonstrates

    that this accelerative option is often negatively regarded by decisionmakers

    and, consequently, is infrequently implemented. Reasons for not allowing

    early entry, for example, focus more on the child's social, emotional or

    physical development than their intellectual readiness. While there is research

    exploring this conundrum, the voice of parents is under-researched. This chapter

    presents the case studies of two four-year-old preschoolers who were purposively

    selected for the study. Both were suitable candidates for early entry, but their

    parents in each case were advised against early entry by preschool personnel.

    These case studies illustrate the complex interplay of social understanding,

    emotional maturity and intellectual precocity in young children. They illustrate

    the need for better training of Early Childhood teachers so that they can appropriately

    respond to the needs of such individuals.

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Vialle, W. (2012). ‘I don’t think I’m a boy!’ Social understanding and giftedness in preschoolers. In H. Stoeger, A. Aljughaiman & B. Harder (Eds.), Talent development and excellence (pp. 117-134). Berlin: LIT-Verlag.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/95

Book Title


  • Talent development and excellence

Start Page


  • 117

End Page


  • 134