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Does training on inhibitory tasks influence alcohol consumption and attitudes?

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Response inhibition – the suppression of a

    prepotent or ongoing action – is an executive

    function central to the regulation of behaviour.

    Response inhibition can be assessed in the

    laboratory using the Go/No-go or Stop-Signal tasks

    which both assess the capacity to withhold an

    inappropriate response. In the Go/No-go task,

    participants are required to respond rapidly to Go

    stimuli but to withhold that response upon No-go

    stimuli. In the Stop-Signal task, participants are

    required to respond to Go stimuli but to withhold the

    response when an auditory stop signal occurs

    subsequent to the Go stimulus.

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Hegarty, B., Rushby, J. A., Johnstone, S. J., Kelly, P. & Smith, J. (2012). Does training on inhibitory tasks influence alcohol consumption and attitudes?. Drug and Alcohol Review, 31 (S1), 32-32.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1046&context=sspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/47

Number Of Pages


  • 0

Start Page


  • 32

End Page


  • 32

Volume


  • 31

Issue


  • S1

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • Response inhibition – the suppression of a

    prepotent or ongoing action – is an executive

    function central to the regulation of behaviour.

    Response inhibition can be assessed in the

    laboratory using the Go/No-go or Stop-Signal tasks

    which both assess the capacity to withhold an

    inappropriate response. In the Go/No-go task,

    participants are required to respond rapidly to Go

    stimuli but to withhold that response upon No-go

    stimuli. In the Stop-Signal task, participants are

    required to respond to Go stimuli but to withhold the

    response when an auditory stop signal occurs

    subsequent to the Go stimulus.

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Hegarty, B., Rushby, J. A., Johnstone, S. J., Kelly, P. & Smith, J. (2012). Does training on inhibitory tasks influence alcohol consumption and attitudes?. Drug and Alcohol Review, 31 (S1), 32-32.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1046&context=sspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/47

Number Of Pages


  • 0

Start Page


  • 32

End Page


  • 32

Volume


  • 31

Issue


  • S1

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom