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Growing use of social media: How can dietitians embrace this trend?

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Social media, a growing global phenomenon, has transformed the interaction between

    healthcare professionals and consumers and the perceived value of dietitians. The aim of the

    present study was to investigate the dietetic use of social media. A cross-sectional online

    survey was conducted among the members of Dietitians Association of Australians (DAA). In

    addition, a pilot test of social media metric analysis tools NodeXL and TweetStat was

    conducted among subsamples of dietitian Twitter and Facebook users. The result showed that

    38.7% of a total of n=340 participants used social media in a professional capacity. Social

    networking sites were used most widely (n=282) and micro-blogging sites used most

    regularly. The most recognised benefit was reported to be communicating internationally and

    remotely, while the least was for the delivery of health care. Participants were also found to

    demonstrate a degree of awareness of online professionalism. In terms of barriers to use, time

    restraint (18.6%) and ‘I don’t know where to start’ (18.6%) were common. The pilot test of

    the TweetStats showed the characteristics of top users one replies to/retweets. The NodeXL

    demonstrated connections between users in a network and measures each user’s influence—

    degree and centrality. In conclusion, the survey shows a low level of engagement in social

    media in a professional capacity among Australian dietitians. However, it also demonstrates

    the prospects for improvement. The pilot test found a number of limitations in both of

    TweetStats and NodeXL analyses, suggesting future research is warranted in developing

    credible social media metric analysis tools.

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Peng, Q. & Probst, Y. (2012). Growing use of social media: How can dietitians embrace this trend?. Nutrition and Dietetics, 69 (1), 133.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4247&context=hbspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/3195

Start Page


  • 133

Volume


  • 69

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication


  • http://www.emobilise.com.au/uploads/1209015abstract00812.pdf

Abstract


  • Social media, a growing global phenomenon, has transformed the interaction between

    healthcare professionals and consumers and the perceived value of dietitians. The aim of the

    present study was to investigate the dietetic use of social media. A cross-sectional online

    survey was conducted among the members of Dietitians Association of Australians (DAA). In

    addition, a pilot test of social media metric analysis tools NodeXL and TweetStat was

    conducted among subsamples of dietitian Twitter and Facebook users. The result showed that

    38.7% of a total of n=340 participants used social media in a professional capacity. Social

    networking sites were used most widely (n=282) and micro-blogging sites used most

    regularly. The most recognised benefit was reported to be communicating internationally and

    remotely, while the least was for the delivery of health care. Participants were also found to

    demonstrate a degree of awareness of online professionalism. In terms of barriers to use, time

    restraint (18.6%) and ‘I don’t know where to start’ (18.6%) were common. The pilot test of

    the TweetStats showed the characteristics of top users one replies to/retweets. The NodeXL

    demonstrated connections between users in a network and measures each user’s influence—

    degree and centrality. In conclusion, the survey shows a low level of engagement in social

    media in a professional capacity among Australian dietitians. However, it also demonstrates

    the prospects for improvement. The pilot test found a number of limitations in both of

    TweetStats and NodeXL analyses, suggesting future research is warranted in developing

    credible social media metric analysis tools.

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Peng, Q. & Probst, Y. (2012). Growing use of social media: How can dietitians embrace this trend?. Nutrition and Dietetics, 69 (1), 133.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4247&context=hbspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/3195

Start Page


  • 133

Volume


  • 69

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication


  • http://www.emobilise.com.au/uploads/1209015abstract00812.pdf