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Competition strength of two significant invasive species in coastal dunes

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • To investigate the effect of increased nutrient availability on competition amongst invasive and native plants, I measured changes in above and below ground biomass of Chrysanthemoides monilifera spp. rotundata (bitou bush) and Asparagus aethiopicus (asparagus fern) competing with two native species, Banksia integrifolia and Ficinia nodosa, under high- and low-nutrient regimes. Bitou bush, as a primary invader, was competitive under all conditions lowering the growth of native species in both high and low nutrients. Asparagus fern as a secondary invader, did not influence growth of native species but responded, like bitou bush, to high nutrients. Native species were generally negatively affected by increases in nutrients. With bitou bush soils often providing higher nutrients, the chance of secondary invasion by asparagus fern is more likely, although asparagus fern is unlikely to invade low nutrient soils quickly. The invasive species, therefore, differed in their competitive ability in these coastal dune communities.

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • French, K. O. (2012). Competition strength of two significant invasive species in coastal dunes. Plant Ecology, 213 (10), 1667-1673.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84870376295

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=7937&context=scipapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/scipapers/4594

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 6

Start Page


  • 1667

End Page


  • 1673

Volume


  • 213

Issue


  • 10

Place Of Publication


  • Netherlands

Abstract


  • To investigate the effect of increased nutrient availability on competition amongst invasive and native plants, I measured changes in above and below ground biomass of Chrysanthemoides monilifera spp. rotundata (bitou bush) and Asparagus aethiopicus (asparagus fern) competing with two native species, Banksia integrifolia and Ficinia nodosa, under high- and low-nutrient regimes. Bitou bush, as a primary invader, was competitive under all conditions lowering the growth of native species in both high and low nutrients. Asparagus fern as a secondary invader, did not influence growth of native species but responded, like bitou bush, to high nutrients. Native species were generally negatively affected by increases in nutrients. With bitou bush soils often providing higher nutrients, the chance of secondary invasion by asparagus fern is more likely, although asparagus fern is unlikely to invade low nutrient soils quickly. The invasive species, therefore, differed in their competitive ability in these coastal dune communities.

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • French, K. O. (2012). Competition strength of two significant invasive species in coastal dunes. Plant Ecology, 213 (10), 1667-1673.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84870376295

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=7937&context=scipapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/scipapers/4594

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 6

Start Page


  • 1667

End Page


  • 1673

Volume


  • 213

Issue


  • 10

Place Of Publication


  • Netherlands