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Confirmation of a late middle Pleistocene age for the Omo Kibish 1 cranium by direct uranium-series dating

Journal Article


Abstract


  • While it is generally accepted that modern humans evolved in Africa, the specific physical evidence for that origin remains disputed. The modern-looking Omo 1 skeleton, discovered in the Kibish region of Ethiopia in 1967, was controversially dated at ∼130 ka (thousands of years ago) by U-series dating on associated Mollusca, and it was not until 2005 that Ar-Ar dating on associated feldspar crystals in pumice clasts provided evidence for an even older age of ∼195 ka. However, questions continue to be raised about the age and stratigraphic position of this crucial fossil specimen. Here we present direct U-series determinations on the Omo 1 cranium. In spite of significant methodological complications, which are discussed in detail, the results indicate that the human remains do not belong to a later intrusive burial and are the earliest representative of anatomically modern humans. Given the more archaic morphology shown by the apparently contemporaneous Omo 2 calvaria, we suggest that direct U-series dating is applied to this fossil as well, to confirm its age in relation to Omo 1. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

UOW Authors


  •   Aubert , Maxime (external author)
  •   Grün, Rainer (external author)
  •   Eggins, Stephen M. (external author)
  •   Kinsley, Leslie (external author)
  •   Stringer, Chris B. (external author)
  •   Pike, Alistair (external author)
  •   Bartsiokas, Antonis (external author)
  •   Day, M (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Aubert, M., Pike, A. W.G., Stringer, C., Bartsiokas, A., Kinsley, L., Eggins, S., Day, M. & Grün, R. (2012). Confirmation of a late middle Pleistocene age for the Omo Kibish 1 cranium by direct uranium-series dating. Journal of Human Evolution, 63 (5), 704-710.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84867451185

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/scipapers/4609

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 6

Start Page


  • 704

End Page


  • 710

Volume


  • 63

Issue


  • 5

Abstract


  • While it is generally accepted that modern humans evolved in Africa, the specific physical evidence for that origin remains disputed. The modern-looking Omo 1 skeleton, discovered in the Kibish region of Ethiopia in 1967, was controversially dated at ∼130 ka (thousands of years ago) by U-series dating on associated Mollusca, and it was not until 2005 that Ar-Ar dating on associated feldspar crystals in pumice clasts provided evidence for an even older age of ∼195 ka. However, questions continue to be raised about the age and stratigraphic position of this crucial fossil specimen. Here we present direct U-series determinations on the Omo 1 cranium. In spite of significant methodological complications, which are discussed in detail, the results indicate that the human remains do not belong to a later intrusive burial and are the earliest representative of anatomically modern humans. Given the more archaic morphology shown by the apparently contemporaneous Omo 2 calvaria, we suggest that direct U-series dating is applied to this fossil as well, to confirm its age in relation to Omo 1. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

UOW Authors


  •   Aubert , Maxime (external author)
  •   Grün, Rainer (external author)
  •   Eggins, Stephen M. (external author)
  •   Kinsley, Leslie (external author)
  •   Stringer, Chris B. (external author)
  •   Pike, Alistair (external author)
  •   Bartsiokas, Antonis (external author)
  •   Day, M (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Aubert, M., Pike, A. W.G., Stringer, C., Bartsiokas, A., Kinsley, L., Eggins, S., Day, M. & Grün, R. (2012). Confirmation of a late middle Pleistocene age for the Omo Kibish 1 cranium by direct uranium-series dating. Journal of Human Evolution, 63 (5), 704-710.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84867451185

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/scipapers/4609

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 6

Start Page


  • 704

End Page


  • 710

Volume


  • 63

Issue


  • 5