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Influence of head orientation and viewpoint oscillation on linear vection

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Sensory conflict theories predict that adding simulated viewpoint oscillation to self-motion displays should generate significant and sustained visual-vestibular conflict and reduce the likelihood of illusory self-motion (vection). However, research shows that viewpoint oscillation enhances vection in upright observers. This study examined whether the oscillation advantage for vection depends on head orientation with respect to gravity. Displays that simulated forward/backward self-motion with/without horizontal and vertical viewpoint oscillation were presented to observers in upright (seated and standing) and lying (supine, prone, and left side down) body postures. Viewpoint oscillation was found to enhance vection for all of the body postures tested. Vection also tended to be stronger in upright postures than in lying postures. Changing the orientation of the head with respect to gravity was expected to alter the degree/saliency of the sensory conflict, which may explain the overall posture-based differences in vection strength. However, this does not explain why the oscillation advantage for vection persisted for all postures. Thus, the current postural and oscillation based vection findings appear to be better explained by ecology: Upright postures and oscillating flow (that are the norm during self-motion) improved vection, whereas lying postures and smooth optic flows (which are less common) impaired vection. © 2012 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.

UOW Authors


  •   Guterman, Pearl S. (external author)
  •   Allison, Robert S. (external author)
  •   Palmisano, Stephen
  •   Zacher, James E. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Guterman, P. S., Allison, R. S., Palmisano, S. & Zacher, J. E. (2012). Influence of head orientation and viewpoint oscillation on linear vection. Journal of Vestibular Research: Equilibrium and Orientation: an international journal of experimental and clinical vestibular science, 22 (2), 105-116.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84867185458

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4154&context=hbspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/3102

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 11

Start Page


  • 105

End Page


  • 116

Volume


  • 22

Issue


  • 2

Place Of Publication


  • Netherlands

Abstract


  • Sensory conflict theories predict that adding simulated viewpoint oscillation to self-motion displays should generate significant and sustained visual-vestibular conflict and reduce the likelihood of illusory self-motion (vection). However, research shows that viewpoint oscillation enhances vection in upright observers. This study examined whether the oscillation advantage for vection depends on head orientation with respect to gravity. Displays that simulated forward/backward self-motion with/without horizontal and vertical viewpoint oscillation were presented to observers in upright (seated and standing) and lying (supine, prone, and left side down) body postures. Viewpoint oscillation was found to enhance vection for all of the body postures tested. Vection also tended to be stronger in upright postures than in lying postures. Changing the orientation of the head with respect to gravity was expected to alter the degree/saliency of the sensory conflict, which may explain the overall posture-based differences in vection strength. However, this does not explain why the oscillation advantage for vection persisted for all postures. Thus, the current postural and oscillation based vection findings appear to be better explained by ecology: Upright postures and oscillating flow (that are the norm during self-motion) improved vection, whereas lying postures and smooth optic flows (which are less common) impaired vection. © 2012 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.

UOW Authors


  •   Guterman, Pearl S. (external author)
  •   Allison, Robert S. (external author)
  •   Palmisano, Stephen
  •   Zacher, James E. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Guterman, P. S., Allison, R. S., Palmisano, S. & Zacher, J. E. (2012). Influence of head orientation and viewpoint oscillation on linear vection. Journal of Vestibular Research: Equilibrium and Orientation: an international journal of experimental and clinical vestibular science, 22 (2), 105-116.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84867185458

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4154&context=hbspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/3102

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 11

Start Page


  • 105

End Page


  • 116

Volume


  • 22

Issue


  • 2

Place Of Publication


  • Netherlands