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Feeling it or faking it? An exploration of discrepant self-and observer-ratings of emapthy among medical students

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Objective

    Studies show discrepancies between self- and observer-ratings of empathy among

    medical students. Presently, there has been limited data and discussion exploring this

    finding. This study explored the discrepancies between self- and observer-ratings of

    empathy by comparing individual differences among medical students. Specifically,

    whether medical students who demonstrated discrepancies in self- and observer-ratings

    of empathy differ from those who did not demonstrate discrepancies, with regards to

    personality, attachment, and clinical competence.

    Method

    Sixty medical students participated in the study. Empathy was rated by an independent

    observer during simulated patient encounters. In addition, empathy was self-rated using

    the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (student version). Personality was measured

    using the Big Five Inventory and attachment was assessed using the Experiences in

    Close Relationships Questionnaire. Clinical competence was evaluated by medical

    examiners during an Objective Structured Clinical Examination.

    Results: The majority of students performed in accordance with their self-ratings of

    empathy. Of those students who had discrepant scores, the majority had inflated selfratings

    as opposed to higher observer-ratings. A one-way ANOVA revealed significant

    differences between the groups on extraversion, openness, and total competence scores.

    Conclusions

    It appears that students differ with regards to extraversion, openness, and total competence.

    We propose that a deficit in metacognitive abilities, in addition to lower clinical competence,

    affects medical student's abilities to provide accurate self-assessments. Furthermore,

    in the minority of cases, it appears that medical students learn that it pays to adopt the

    view that “if you cannot feel it, fake it”.

UOW Authors


  •   Ogle, Jessica (external author)
  •   Bushnell, John (external author)
  •   Caputi, Peter

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Ogle, J., Bushnell, J. A. & Caputi, P. (2012). Feeling it or faking it? An exploration of discrepant self-and observer-ratings of emapthy among medical students. Annual Conference of the Association for Health Professional Education (ANZAPHE) (pp. 149-149). New Zealand: ANZAPHE.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/medpapers/482

Start Page


  • 149

End Page


  • 149

Place Of Publication


  • http://anzahpe.org/Front-news/2012-annual-conference.html

Abstract


  • Objective

    Studies show discrepancies between self- and observer-ratings of empathy among

    medical students. Presently, there has been limited data and discussion exploring this

    finding. This study explored the discrepancies between self- and observer-ratings of

    empathy by comparing individual differences among medical students. Specifically,

    whether medical students who demonstrated discrepancies in self- and observer-ratings

    of empathy differ from those who did not demonstrate discrepancies, with regards to

    personality, attachment, and clinical competence.

    Method

    Sixty medical students participated in the study. Empathy was rated by an independent

    observer during simulated patient encounters. In addition, empathy was self-rated using

    the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (student version). Personality was measured

    using the Big Five Inventory and attachment was assessed using the Experiences in

    Close Relationships Questionnaire. Clinical competence was evaluated by medical

    examiners during an Objective Structured Clinical Examination.

    Results: The majority of students performed in accordance with their self-ratings of

    empathy. Of those students who had discrepant scores, the majority had inflated selfratings

    as opposed to higher observer-ratings. A one-way ANOVA revealed significant

    differences between the groups on extraversion, openness, and total competence scores.

    Conclusions

    It appears that students differ with regards to extraversion, openness, and total competence.

    We propose that a deficit in metacognitive abilities, in addition to lower clinical competence,

    affects medical student's abilities to provide accurate self-assessments. Furthermore,

    in the minority of cases, it appears that medical students learn that it pays to adopt the

    view that “if you cannot feel it, fake it”.

UOW Authors


  •   Ogle, Jessica (external author)
  •   Bushnell, John (external author)
  •   Caputi, Peter

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Ogle, J., Bushnell, J. A. & Caputi, P. (2012). Feeling it or faking it? An exploration of discrepant self-and observer-ratings of emapthy among medical students. Annual Conference of the Association for Health Professional Education (ANZAPHE) (pp. 149-149). New Zealand: ANZAPHE.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/medpapers/482

Start Page


  • 149

End Page


  • 149

Place Of Publication


  • http://anzahpe.org/Front-news/2012-annual-conference.html