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Abnormal EEG in routine psychiatry practice

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Background: Electroencephalogram (EEG) is commonly or uncommonly used in daily clinical practice. EEG helps to unlock or diagnose underlying organic issue and helps to share light on the future prognosis of the patient. It helps to differentiate the organic from functional disorders. The distinction from organic to functional is vague and probably need further clarification.

    Objectives: If the findings are normal, we may not do anything. If the findings are abnormal, then what does it mean? What else do we do? Should we do EEG routinely? We aim to answer these questions in our paper.

    Methods/findings: We reviewed all the records of the patients presented to Mirrabook Jan.–Dec. 2011. We reviewed the EEG findings of these patients. Of the two categories, we then analysed the data and asked the above questions. We then did a literature search on the topic. We aim to present the findings of the paper.

    Conclusions: EEG is an important investigation and should be used cautiously. The outcomes of an abnormal EEG may or may not change the treatment.

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Garg, V., Garg, H., Pai, N. Brahmavar. & Malesu, R. (2012). Abnormal EEG in routine psychiatry practice. In RANZCP 2012 Congress, 20-24 May, Hobart, Tasmania. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 46 (S1), 37-37.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/medpapers/452

Number Of Pages


  • 0

Start Page


  • 37

End Page


  • 37

Volume


  • 46

Issue


  • S1

Place Of Publication


  • Australia

Abstract


  • Background: Electroencephalogram (EEG) is commonly or uncommonly used in daily clinical practice. EEG helps to unlock or diagnose underlying organic issue and helps to share light on the future prognosis of the patient. It helps to differentiate the organic from functional disorders. The distinction from organic to functional is vague and probably need further clarification.

    Objectives: If the findings are normal, we may not do anything. If the findings are abnormal, then what does it mean? What else do we do? Should we do EEG routinely? We aim to answer these questions in our paper.

    Methods/findings: We reviewed all the records of the patients presented to Mirrabook Jan.–Dec. 2011. We reviewed the EEG findings of these patients. Of the two categories, we then analysed the data and asked the above questions. We then did a literature search on the topic. We aim to present the findings of the paper.

    Conclusions: EEG is an important investigation and should be used cautiously. The outcomes of an abnormal EEG may or may not change the treatment.

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Garg, V., Garg, H., Pai, N. Brahmavar. & Malesu, R. (2012). Abnormal EEG in routine psychiatry practice. In RANZCP 2012 Congress, 20-24 May, Hobart, Tasmania. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 46 (S1), 37-37.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/medpapers/452

Number Of Pages


  • 0

Start Page


  • 37

End Page


  • 37

Volume


  • 46

Issue


  • S1

Place Of Publication


  • Australia