Skip to main content
placeholder image

A place for art: the University of Wollongong art collection

Book


Download full-text (Open Access)

Abstract


  • One of the most visible realisations of the University of Wollongong’s commitment to integrating art into everyday campus experience is Bert Flugelman’s sculpture Gateway to Mount Keira. The stainless steel archway is positioned to mark the escarpment at a significant place of learning for the Dharawal people, the traditional owners of the land. Close by on the main campus stands May Barrie’s totemic stone sculpture Viva Solaris which, as long-time staff recall, was met with some surprise when it was placed there in 1977. For although Barrie was a local resident with a unique reputation in Australian art as a stone carver and an exhibition record dating back to 1947, the importance of art to the life of the University was still a nascent concept. The University of Wollongong Art Collection began in the late 1970s. Like other institutional collections, its genesis was a combination of realising acquisition opportunities and random, but welcomed, donations. The visual arts’ presence on campus gained focus in 1983, when Edward Cowie arrived to take up leadership of the newly formed School of Creative Arts with a ‘vision splendid’ for an interdisciplinary arts centre. An ordered collecting of staff and student work was developed and by the late 1980s the UOW Art Collection was formalised. It grew in scale and significance, initially with John Eveleigh as director, followed by Guy Warren from 1992 to 2005, assisted during that time by Didier Balez and Glenn Barkley. Barkley was later curator of the Art Collection until 2008.

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Lawson, J. A. A place for art: the University of Wollongong art collection. Wollongong, NSW: University of Wollongong, 2012.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1003&context=uowbooks

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/uowbooks/4

Abstract


  • One of the most visible realisations of the University of Wollongong’s commitment to integrating art into everyday campus experience is Bert Flugelman’s sculpture Gateway to Mount Keira. The stainless steel archway is positioned to mark the escarpment at a significant place of learning for the Dharawal people, the traditional owners of the land. Close by on the main campus stands May Barrie’s totemic stone sculpture Viva Solaris which, as long-time staff recall, was met with some surprise when it was placed there in 1977. For although Barrie was a local resident with a unique reputation in Australian art as a stone carver and an exhibition record dating back to 1947, the importance of art to the life of the University was still a nascent concept. The University of Wollongong Art Collection began in the late 1970s. Like other institutional collections, its genesis was a combination of realising acquisition opportunities and random, but welcomed, donations. The visual arts’ presence on campus gained focus in 1983, when Edward Cowie arrived to take up leadership of the newly formed School of Creative Arts with a ‘vision splendid’ for an interdisciplinary arts centre. An ordered collecting of staff and student work was developed and by the late 1980s the UOW Art Collection was formalised. It grew in scale and significance, initially with John Eveleigh as director, followed by Guy Warren from 1992 to 2005, assisted during that time by Didier Balez and Glenn Barkley. Barkley was later curator of the Art Collection until 2008.

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Lawson, J. A. A place for art: the University of Wollongong art collection. Wollongong, NSW: University of Wollongong, 2012.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1003&context=uowbooks

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/uowbooks/4