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All night silence: Live experimental sound in New Zealand public art galleries

Chapter


Abstract


  • Since the late 19th century there have been

    issues with the presentation and reception

    of sound and music in New Zealand public

    art galleries. During the first New Zealand

    and South Seas Exhibition in 1889-1890

    there were numerous musical events

    designed to prove New Zealand's position

    culturally and socially on the world stage.

    Audience members would spend the day

    traipsing around the enormous pavilions

    of the exhibition pausing to engage in a

    performance before blundering out to the

    next event. This mobile audience knew

    something about the relationship between

    music and art. Art was silent, static and

    contained within the walls of the gallery,

    and music was not. Music was dynamic, and

    formed part of a public programme which

    a listener could choose to attend for a

    specified duration.

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Ballard, S. "All night silence: Live experimental sound in New Zealand public art galleries." Erewhon Calling: Experimental Sound in New Zealand. Ed.B. Russell. Auckland: Audio Foundation and CMR, 2012, 54-59.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/creartspapers/423

Book Title


  • Erewhon Calling: Experimental Sound in New Zealand

Start Page


  • 54

End Page


  • 59

Abstract


  • Since the late 19th century there have been

    issues with the presentation and reception

    of sound and music in New Zealand public

    art galleries. During the first New Zealand

    and South Seas Exhibition in 1889-1890

    there were numerous musical events

    designed to prove New Zealand's position

    culturally and socially on the world stage.

    Audience members would spend the day

    traipsing around the enormous pavilions

    of the exhibition pausing to engage in a

    performance before blundering out to the

    next event. This mobile audience knew

    something about the relationship between

    music and art. Art was silent, static and

    contained within the walls of the gallery,

    and music was not. Music was dynamic, and

    formed part of a public programme which

    a listener could choose to attend for a

    specified duration.

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Ballard, S. "All night silence: Live experimental sound in New Zealand public art galleries." Erewhon Calling: Experimental Sound in New Zealand. Ed.B. Russell. Auckland: Audio Foundation and CMR, 2012, 54-59.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/creartspapers/423

Book Title


  • Erewhon Calling: Experimental Sound in New Zealand

Start Page


  • 54

End Page


  • 59