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Sub-branding affect transfer: the role of product category crowdedness and brand loyalty

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Although there is evidence demonstrating affect transfer from a brand to its extensions (Keller and Aaker 1992, 1993), scant research focuses on affect transfer when a firm attempts to add sub-brands into its brand portfolio. The findings from four experiments show that affect associated with a family brand does in fact transfer to its sub-brand (experiment 1); however, the transfer of affect is contingent upon product category crowdedness and brand loyalty. For example, affect transfer only occurs in a

    less crowded product category setting, but not in a more crowded product category setting (experiment 2). The suppressed affect transfer in a more crowded product category setting is restored for consumers who are highly loyal to the family brand (experiment 3), and the observed affect transfer in a in a less crowded product category setting is suppressed for consumers who are highly loyal to the family brand’s competitor (experiment 4).

Authors


  •   Chen, Qimei (external author)
  •   He, Yi (external author)
  •   Lee, Ruby P. (external author)
  •   Tam, Leona

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • He, Y., Chen, Q., Tam, W. & Lee, R. P. (2012). Sub-branding affect transfer: the role of product category crowdedness and brand loyalty. Summer Marketing Educators Conference 2012 (p. 59). Chicago, Illinois: Amercian Marketing Association.

Start Page


  • 59

Abstract


  • Although there is evidence demonstrating affect transfer from a brand to its extensions (Keller and Aaker 1992, 1993), scant research focuses on affect transfer when a firm attempts to add sub-brands into its brand portfolio. The findings from four experiments show that affect associated with a family brand does in fact transfer to its sub-brand (experiment 1); however, the transfer of affect is contingent upon product category crowdedness and brand loyalty. For example, affect transfer only occurs in a

    less crowded product category setting, but not in a more crowded product category setting (experiment 2). The suppressed affect transfer in a more crowded product category setting is restored for consumers who are highly loyal to the family brand (experiment 3), and the observed affect transfer in a in a less crowded product category setting is suppressed for consumers who are highly loyal to the family brand’s competitor (experiment 4).

Authors


  •   Chen, Qimei (external author)
  •   He, Yi (external author)
  •   Lee, Ruby P. (external author)
  •   Tam, Leona

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • He, Y., Chen, Q., Tam, W. & Lee, R. P. (2012). Sub-branding affect transfer: the role of product category crowdedness and brand loyalty. Summer Marketing Educators Conference 2012 (p. 59). Chicago, Illinois: Amercian Marketing Association.

Start Page


  • 59