Skip to main content

Assessing the feasibility of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in promoting psychological adjustment after severe traumatic brain injury

Journal Article


Abstract


  • This study evaluated the feasibility of

    a treatment program utilising Acceptance and

    Commitment Therapy (ACT) to address psychological

    adjustment to severe traumatic brain

    injury (TBI). ACT focuses on persons’ relationship

    with internal experiences such as thoughts,

    emotions and memories in order for them to live

    a life consistent with their values. Treatment

    goals include increasing psychological flexibility,

    participation in valued life roles and reducing

    psychological distress.

    Method: Two participants (both male, P1 aged 20

    years, P2 aged 28 years) with severe TBI and

    demonstrating psychological distress, as measured

    by the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-

    588 Abstract

    Brain Inj Downloaded from informahealthcare.com by University Of Wollongong on 10/10/12

    For personal use only.

    21), were recruited from the Brain Injury

    Rehabilitation Unit, Liverpool Hospital outpatient

    service. They jointly engaged in a seven session

    treatment program based on ACT principles. Pre

    and post-treatment measures of mood, psychological

    flexibility and participation were undertaken in

    addition to sessional measures. Statistical analysis

    involved calculating reliable change for single case

    study analysis.

    Results: Both participants demonstrated improvements

    in their psychological flexibility with P1’s

    change being significant (P1 RCI¼1.98, P2

    RCI¼1.38). They both demonstrated significant

    decreases in their level of psychological distress (P1

    DASS-stress RCI¼ -.2.54, P2 DASS-anxiety RCI¼

    -5.11). P2 also reported an increase of 6.9 points on

    participation, approaching the criterion for significant

    reliable change (a change of 8 points).

    Moreover, both participants achieved goals set in

    accordance with their values.

    Conclusions: ACT shows initial promise as a

    suitable therapy to improve psychological flexibility,

    increase participation and reduce psychological

    distress among people with severe TBI.

    Further research needs to assess the program in

    a controlled trial with a larger sample.

UOW Authors


  •   Whiting, Diane L. (external author)
  •   Simpson, Grahame K. (external author)
  •   Ciarrochi, Joseph (external author)
  •   McLeod, Hamish J. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Whiting, D. L., Simpson, G., Ciarrochi, J. & McLeod, H. J. (2012). Assessing the feasibility of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in promoting psychological adjustment after severe traumatic brain injury. Brain Injury, 26 (4-5), 588-589.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/3008

Number Of Pages


  • 1

Start Page


  • 588

End Page


  • 589

Volume


  • 26

Issue


  • 4-5

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • This study evaluated the feasibility of

    a treatment program utilising Acceptance and

    Commitment Therapy (ACT) to address psychological

    adjustment to severe traumatic brain

    injury (TBI). ACT focuses on persons’ relationship

    with internal experiences such as thoughts,

    emotions and memories in order for them to live

    a life consistent with their values. Treatment

    goals include increasing psychological flexibility,

    participation in valued life roles and reducing

    psychological distress.

    Method: Two participants (both male, P1 aged 20

    years, P2 aged 28 years) with severe TBI and

    demonstrating psychological distress, as measured

    by the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-

    588 Abstract

    Brain Inj Downloaded from informahealthcare.com by University Of Wollongong on 10/10/12

    For personal use only.

    21), were recruited from the Brain Injury

    Rehabilitation Unit, Liverpool Hospital outpatient

    service. They jointly engaged in a seven session

    treatment program based on ACT principles. Pre

    and post-treatment measures of mood, psychological

    flexibility and participation were undertaken in

    addition to sessional measures. Statistical analysis

    involved calculating reliable change for single case

    study analysis.

    Results: Both participants demonstrated improvements

    in their psychological flexibility with P1’s

    change being significant (P1 RCI¼1.98, P2

    RCI¼1.38). They both demonstrated significant

    decreases in their level of psychological distress (P1

    DASS-stress RCI¼ -.2.54, P2 DASS-anxiety RCI¼

    -5.11). P2 also reported an increase of 6.9 points on

    participation, approaching the criterion for significant

    reliable change (a change of 8 points).

    Moreover, both participants achieved goals set in

    accordance with their values.

    Conclusions: ACT shows initial promise as a

    suitable therapy to improve psychological flexibility,

    increase participation and reduce psychological

    distress among people with severe TBI.

    Further research needs to assess the program in

    a controlled trial with a larger sample.

UOW Authors


  •   Whiting, Diane L. (external author)
  •   Simpson, Grahame K. (external author)
  •   Ciarrochi, Joseph (external author)
  •   McLeod, Hamish J. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Whiting, D. L., Simpson, G., Ciarrochi, J. & McLeod, H. J. (2012). Assessing the feasibility of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in promoting psychological adjustment after severe traumatic brain injury. Brain Injury, 26 (4-5), 588-589.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/3008

Number Of Pages


  • 1

Start Page


  • 588

End Page


  • 589

Volume


  • 26

Issue


  • 4-5

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom