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The social penalty of work/family balance. Comparing Australian men and women's social contact with ex-household friends and family

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Social contact is an important correlate for wellbeing, with gender dimensions. Women risk social disconnection through financial incapacity from labour market disengagement, and men from an inability to manage work-life commitments in marriage, separation and retirement. This may reflect Emerick’s (2006) suggestions that women prefer informal ‘bonding’ contact, while men prefer work-oriented ‘bridging’ contact, but raises concerns of social time poverty for singles, and bonding/bridging trade-off inequities for partners. This paper examines gendered social contact with ex-household friends and family using the 2006 Australian Time Use Survey. Results show that men have less social contact despite all controls; that labour market disengagement - student, female part-time, or male not in the labour force - adds to social time; and that partnered parents have the least social contact, while separated non-parents and singles have the most. It highlights the importance of masculinity and nuclear-familialism issues in understanding ‘work-family-social life’ balance.

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • Patulny, R. 2011, ''The social penalty of work/family balance. Comparing Australian men and women''s social contact with ex-household friends and family'', The 2011 Australian Sociological Association Conference - Local Lives/Global Networks, The Australian Sociological Association, Australia, p. 150.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/artspapers/1259

Start Page


  • 150

Place Of Publication


  • Australia

Abstract


  • Social contact is an important correlate for wellbeing, with gender dimensions. Women risk social disconnection through financial incapacity from labour market disengagement, and men from an inability to manage work-life commitments in marriage, separation and retirement. This may reflect Emerick’s (2006) suggestions that women prefer informal ‘bonding’ contact, while men prefer work-oriented ‘bridging’ contact, but raises concerns of social time poverty for singles, and bonding/bridging trade-off inequities for partners. This paper examines gendered social contact with ex-household friends and family using the 2006 Australian Time Use Survey. Results show that men have less social contact despite all controls; that labour market disengagement - student, female part-time, or male not in the labour force - adds to social time; and that partnered parents have the least social contact, while separated non-parents and singles have the most. It highlights the importance of masculinity and nuclear-familialism issues in understanding ‘work-family-social life’ balance.

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • Patulny, R. 2011, ''The social penalty of work/family balance. Comparing Australian men and women''s social contact with ex-household friends and family'', The 2011 Australian Sociological Association Conference - Local Lives/Global Networks, The Australian Sociological Association, Australia, p. 150.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/artspapers/1259

Start Page


  • 150

Place Of Publication


  • Australia