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Front-of-pack food labelling: Traffic light labelling gets the green light

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • The placement of nutrition information on the front of food packages

    has been proposed as a method of providing simplified and visible

    nutrition information. This study aimed to determine the most acceptable

    and effective front-of-pack food labelling system for Australian

    consumers. Consumers’ preferences and ability to compare the healthiness

    of mock food products were assessed for different front-of-pack

    labelling systems. Four systems were tested, including two variations

    of the Percentage Daily Intake (%DI) system (Monochrome %DI and

    Colour-Coded %DI), which display the proportion of daily nutrient

    contribution that a serve of food provides; and two variations of the

    Traffic Light system (Traffic Light and Traffic Light + Overall Rating),

    which uses colour-coding to indicate nutrient levels. Intercept surveys

    with 790 consumers were conducted across four locations, where each

    participant was exposed to a single labelling system for performance

    testing. Participants indicated strong support for the inclusion of nutrient

    information on total fat, saturated fat, sugar and sodium on the front

    of packages, and a consistent labelling format across all products. Using

    the Traffic Light system, participants were five times more likely to

    identify healthier foods compared to the Monochrome %DI system

    (OR = 5.18; p < 0.001), and three times more likely compared to the

    Colour-Coded %DI system (OR = 3.01; p < 0.05). The Traffic Light

    system was the most effective in assisting consumers to identify

    healthier foods. Mandatory Traffic Light labelling regulations are

    recommended to assist consumers in making healthy food choices.

UOW Authors


  •   Kelly Gillott, Bridget
  •   Hughes, Clare (external author)
  •   Chapman, Kathy (external author)
  •   Louie, Jimmy Chun Yu (external author)
  •   Dixon, Helen (external author)
  •   Crawford, Jennifer (external author)
  •   King, Lesley (external author)
  •   Daube, Mike (external author)
  •   Slevin, Terry (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • Kelly, B., Hughes, C., Chapman, K., Louie, J., Dixon, H., Crawford, J., King, L., Daube, M. & Slevin, T. (2009). Front-of-pack food labelling: Traffic light labelling gets the green light. Dietitians Association of Australia 27th National Conference (pp. A17-A17).

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/2813

Start Page


  • A17

End Page


  • A17

Abstract


  • The placement of nutrition information on the front of food packages

    has been proposed as a method of providing simplified and visible

    nutrition information. This study aimed to determine the most acceptable

    and effective front-of-pack food labelling system for Australian

    consumers. Consumers’ preferences and ability to compare the healthiness

    of mock food products were assessed for different front-of-pack

    labelling systems. Four systems were tested, including two variations

    of the Percentage Daily Intake (%DI) system (Monochrome %DI and

    Colour-Coded %DI), which display the proportion of daily nutrient

    contribution that a serve of food provides; and two variations of the

    Traffic Light system (Traffic Light and Traffic Light + Overall Rating),

    which uses colour-coding to indicate nutrient levels. Intercept surveys

    with 790 consumers were conducted across four locations, where each

    participant was exposed to a single labelling system for performance

    testing. Participants indicated strong support for the inclusion of nutrient

    information on total fat, saturated fat, sugar and sodium on the front

    of packages, and a consistent labelling format across all products. Using

    the Traffic Light system, participants were five times more likely to

    identify healthier foods compared to the Monochrome %DI system

    (OR = 5.18; p < 0.001), and three times more likely compared to the

    Colour-Coded %DI system (OR = 3.01; p < 0.05). The Traffic Light

    system was the most effective in assisting consumers to identify

    healthier foods. Mandatory Traffic Light labelling regulations are

    recommended to assist consumers in making healthy food choices.

UOW Authors


  •   Kelly Gillott, Bridget
  •   Hughes, Clare (external author)
  •   Chapman, Kathy (external author)
  •   Louie, Jimmy Chun Yu (external author)
  •   Dixon, Helen (external author)
  •   Crawford, Jennifer (external author)
  •   King, Lesley (external author)
  •   Daube, Mike (external author)
  •   Slevin, Terry (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • Kelly, B., Hughes, C., Chapman, K., Louie, J., Dixon, H., Crawford, J., King, L., Daube, M. & Slevin, T. (2009). Front-of-pack food labelling: Traffic light labelling gets the green light. Dietitians Association of Australia 27th National Conference (pp. A17-A17).

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/2813

Start Page


  • A17

End Page


  • A17