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Evaluating the implementation of a warfarin specific medication chart in residential aged care facilities

Conference Paper


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Abstract


  • BACKGROUND

    A study conducted by the research team identified barriers to safe use of warfarin in Residential Aged Care Facilities (RACFs) and a warfarin-specific medication chart was recommended.

    RESEARCH DESIGN

    An action research study using a qualitative approach was adopted to evaluate the implementation a warfarin-specific medication chart. Data were generated from interviews and an audit tool. Participants were: General Practitioners (GPs), Registered Nurses (RNs) and older people living in RACFs. The University of Wollongong Health Research Ethics Committee approved the study. Phase One was working with those involved in warfarin management to develop a chart; Phase was implementation of use of the chart and Phase Three evaluated the impact of the chart.

    RESULTS

    The study was undertaken across 3 RACFs with 23 older people receiving warfarin. Education sessions (n=11) were offered to RACF staff (n=56). GPs (n=10) and RNs (n=12) completed the audit tool over 3 months. The GPs and RNs reported that the chart: improved communication (100 and 50 per cent respectively); was easy to use (100 and 91 per cent respective) and time-saving (100 and 50 per cent respectively) and enhanced prescription and administration (89 and 91 per cent respectively). All GPs and RNs (100 and 100 per cent respectively) recommended the use of the chart.

    RESULTS

    The study was undertaken across 3 RACFs with 23 older people receiving warfarin. Education sessions (n=11) were offered to RACF staff (n=56). GPs (n=10) and RNs (n=12) completed the audit tool over 3 months. The GPs and RNs reported that the chart: improved communication (100 and 50 per cent respectively); was easy to use (100 and 91 per cent respective) and time-saving (100 and 50 per cent respectively) and enhanced prescription and administration (89 and 91 per cent respectively). All GPs and RNs (100 and 100 per cent respectively) recommended the use of the chart.

    CONCLUSIONS

    GPs and RNs unequivocally recommended the use of the warfarin-specific medication chart. The findings indicate that the chart can enhance patient safety. Future research will analyse adverse events experienced by older people living in RACFs who receive warfarin.

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • Jordan, M. L., Mullan, J. & Traynor, V. (2011). Evaluating the implementation of a warfarin specific medication chart in residential aged care facilities. Gerontology & Geriatrics 2011 (pp. 125-125). Australia: Asia / Oceania Region of the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1077&context=medpapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/medpapers/73

Start Page


  • 125

End Page


  • 125

Place Of Publication


  • Australia

Abstract


  • BACKGROUND

    A study conducted by the research team identified barriers to safe use of warfarin in Residential Aged Care Facilities (RACFs) and a warfarin-specific medication chart was recommended.

    RESEARCH DESIGN

    An action research study using a qualitative approach was adopted to evaluate the implementation a warfarin-specific medication chart. Data were generated from interviews and an audit tool. Participants were: General Practitioners (GPs), Registered Nurses (RNs) and older people living in RACFs. The University of Wollongong Health Research Ethics Committee approved the study. Phase One was working with those involved in warfarin management to develop a chart; Phase was implementation of use of the chart and Phase Three evaluated the impact of the chart.

    RESULTS

    The study was undertaken across 3 RACFs with 23 older people receiving warfarin. Education sessions (n=11) were offered to RACF staff (n=56). GPs (n=10) and RNs (n=12) completed the audit tool over 3 months. The GPs and RNs reported that the chart: improved communication (100 and 50 per cent respectively); was easy to use (100 and 91 per cent respective) and time-saving (100 and 50 per cent respectively) and enhanced prescription and administration (89 and 91 per cent respectively). All GPs and RNs (100 and 100 per cent respectively) recommended the use of the chart.

    RESULTS

    The study was undertaken across 3 RACFs with 23 older people receiving warfarin. Education sessions (n=11) were offered to RACF staff (n=56). GPs (n=10) and RNs (n=12) completed the audit tool over 3 months. The GPs and RNs reported that the chart: improved communication (100 and 50 per cent respectively); was easy to use (100 and 91 per cent respective) and time-saving (100 and 50 per cent respectively) and enhanced prescription and administration (89 and 91 per cent respectively). All GPs and RNs (100 and 100 per cent respectively) recommended the use of the chart.

    CONCLUSIONS

    GPs and RNs unequivocally recommended the use of the warfarin-specific medication chart. The findings indicate that the chart can enhance patient safety. Future research will analyse adverse events experienced by older people living in RACFs who receive warfarin.

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • Jordan, M. L., Mullan, J. & Traynor, V. (2011). Evaluating the implementation of a warfarin specific medication chart in residential aged care facilities. Gerontology & Geriatrics 2011 (pp. 125-125). Australia: Asia / Oceania Region of the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1077&context=medpapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/medpapers/73

Start Page


  • 125

End Page


  • 125

Place Of Publication


  • Australia