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Dietary oleic acid as a control fatty acid for a polyunsaturated fatty acid intervention studies: A transcriptomics and proteomics investigation using interleukin-10 gene-deficient mice

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Oleic acid (OA) has been used as a control fatty acid in dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)

    intervention studies due to its lack of effect on eiconasoid biosynthesis. Since the effect of OA as

    a control fatty acid has not yet been investigated for transcriptomics and proteomics studies, this

    study aimed to test whether colonic transcriptome and proteome profiles associated with colitis

    development in mice fed a linoleic acid-rich corn oil-AIN-76A diet (Il10–/– compared to C57 mice)

    were similar to those of OA-fed Il10–/– compared to C57 mice (genotype comparison). A close clustering

    of colonic gene and protein expression profiles between the mice fed the AIN-76A or OA

    diet was observed. Inflammation-induced regulatory processes associated with cellular and humoral

    immune responses, cellular stress response and metabolic processes related to energy utilization

    were identified in Il10–/– compared to C57 mice fed either diet. Thus OA was considered

    as a suitable control unsaturated fatty acid for use in multi-omics PUFA studies. The second aim

    of this study was to test the effect of an OA-enriched AIN-76A diet compared to a linoleic acid-rich

    corn oil-AIN-76A diet on colonic transcriptome and proteome changes within Il10–/– or C57 mice

    (diet comparison). Overall, there was a limited concordance observed between measureable transcriptomics and proteomics profiles for genotype and diet comparisons. This underlines the importance and validity of a systems biology approach to understand the effects of diet on gene expression as a function of the genotype.

UOW Authors


  •   Suesse, Bianca
  •   Barnett, Matthew P. G. (external author)
  •   Cooney, Janine (external author)
  •   McNabb, Warren C. (external author)
  •   Barraclough, Diane (external author)
  •   Laing, William (external author)
  •   Roy, Nicole C. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • Knock, B., Barnett, M. P. G., Cooney, J., McNabb, W. C., Barraclough, D., Laing, W. & Roy, N. (2010). Dietary oleic acid as a control fatty acid for a polyunsaturated fatty acid intervention studies: A transcriptomics and proteomics investigation using interleukin-10 gene-deficient mice. Biotechnology Journal, 5 (11), 1226-1240.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-78349294219

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/ihmri/208

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 14

Start Page


  • 1226

End Page


  • 1240

Volume


  • 5

Issue


  • 11

Abstract


  • Oleic acid (OA) has been used as a control fatty acid in dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)

    intervention studies due to its lack of effect on eiconasoid biosynthesis. Since the effect of OA as

    a control fatty acid has not yet been investigated for transcriptomics and proteomics studies, this

    study aimed to test whether colonic transcriptome and proteome profiles associated with colitis

    development in mice fed a linoleic acid-rich corn oil-AIN-76A diet (Il10–/– compared to C57 mice)

    were similar to those of OA-fed Il10–/– compared to C57 mice (genotype comparison). A close clustering

    of colonic gene and protein expression profiles between the mice fed the AIN-76A or OA

    diet was observed. Inflammation-induced regulatory processes associated with cellular and humoral

    immune responses, cellular stress response and metabolic processes related to energy utilization

    were identified in Il10–/– compared to C57 mice fed either diet. Thus OA was considered

    as a suitable control unsaturated fatty acid for use in multi-omics PUFA studies. The second aim

    of this study was to test the effect of an OA-enriched AIN-76A diet compared to a linoleic acid-rich

    corn oil-AIN-76A diet on colonic transcriptome and proteome changes within Il10–/– or C57 mice

    (diet comparison). Overall, there was a limited concordance observed between measureable transcriptomics and proteomics profiles for genotype and diet comparisons. This underlines the importance and validity of a systems biology approach to understand the effects of diet on gene expression as a function of the genotype.

UOW Authors


  •   Suesse, Bianca
  •   Barnett, Matthew P. G. (external author)
  •   Cooney, Janine (external author)
  •   McNabb, Warren C. (external author)
  •   Barraclough, Diane (external author)
  •   Laing, William (external author)
  •   Roy, Nicole C. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • Knock, B., Barnett, M. P. G., Cooney, J., McNabb, W. C., Barraclough, D., Laing, W. & Roy, N. (2010). Dietary oleic acid as a control fatty acid for a polyunsaturated fatty acid intervention studies: A transcriptomics and proteomics investigation using interleukin-10 gene-deficient mice. Biotechnology Journal, 5 (11), 1226-1240.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-78349294219

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/ihmri/208

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 14

Start Page


  • 1226

End Page


  • 1240

Volume


  • 5

Issue


  • 11