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Occupational decision-related processes for amotivated adolescents: confirmation of a model

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Abstract

    This study developed and (statistically) confirmed a new model of the occupational

    decision-related processes of adolescents, in terms of the extent to which they may

    be amotivated about choosing a future occupation. A theoretical framework guided

    the study. A questionnaire that had previously been administered to an Australian

    adolescent sample was refined and then administered to a sample of 566 Australian

    Grade 11 students attending a stratified random sample of 16 government high

    schools in the Sydney metropolitan area. The data were analyzed using structural

    equation modeling. The major finding was the development and empirical confirmation

    of a model of the occupational decision-related processes of amotivated

    Australian adolescents, which suggested that within the context of the study:

    (a) social influences from the family may allow adolescents to see the relationship

    between making an occupational decision and its consequences, (b) occupational

    amotivation may be associated with a lack of decidedness about a future occupation,

    a non-expectancy for occupational success, and a non-valuing of interest/enjoyment

    in occupations, (c) those who value recognition are likely to be expect success in a

    future occupation, and (d) those with an expectancy for occupational success are

    likely to be undecided about their future occupation. Psychologists, career

    managers, counselors, educators, and families may be able to use the findings to

    assist amotivated adolescents in their occupation-related decisions.

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • Jung, J. Yup. & McCormick, J. (2011). Occupational decision-related processes for amotivated adolescents: confirmation of a model. Journal of Career Development, 38 (4), 275-292.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-79960747141

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/edupapers/1040

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 17

Start Page


  • 275

End Page


  • 292

Volume


  • 38

Issue


  • 4

Abstract


  • Abstract

    This study developed and (statistically) confirmed a new model of the occupational

    decision-related processes of adolescents, in terms of the extent to which they may

    be amotivated about choosing a future occupation. A theoretical framework guided

    the study. A questionnaire that had previously been administered to an Australian

    adolescent sample was refined and then administered to a sample of 566 Australian

    Grade 11 students attending a stratified random sample of 16 government high

    schools in the Sydney metropolitan area. The data were analyzed using structural

    equation modeling. The major finding was the development and empirical confirmation

    of a model of the occupational decision-related processes of amotivated

    Australian adolescents, which suggested that within the context of the study:

    (a) social influences from the family may allow adolescents to see the relationship

    between making an occupational decision and its consequences, (b) occupational

    amotivation may be associated with a lack of decidedness about a future occupation,

    a non-expectancy for occupational success, and a non-valuing of interest/enjoyment

    in occupations, (c) those who value recognition are likely to be expect success in a

    future occupation, and (d) those with an expectancy for occupational success are

    likely to be undecided about their future occupation. Psychologists, career

    managers, counselors, educators, and families may be able to use the findings to

    assist amotivated adolescents in their occupation-related decisions.

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • Jung, J. Yup. & McCormick, J. (2011). Occupational decision-related processes for amotivated adolescents: confirmation of a model. Journal of Career Development, 38 (4), 275-292.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-79960747141

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/edupapers/1040

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 17

Start Page


  • 275

End Page


  • 292

Volume


  • 38

Issue


  • 4