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Who cares wins: owning the learning transition

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Purpose – Higher education is seeking ways to close the perceived gap between employer's expectations of graduates and the current preparation these graduates receive. Experiential learning programs offer students one such opportunity to develop professionally and acquire generic workplace skills. This transition however, from the classroom to the workplace, can be a challenging process for students, and is the focus of this paper.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper discusses the importance of programs and their supervisors integrating “caring” into work placements. Several stages of the transition process are discussed before seven principles of a successful student transition are outlined.

    Findings – This paper demonstrates how a beyond duty of care approach can be adopted in experiential learning programs through seven key principles.

    Practical implications – It is anticipated that prioritizing a transition that enlarges the notion of student “care” and adoption of the seven key principles will narrow the perceived gap between employers and higher education's expectations of graduates.

    Originality/value – While experiential learning programs involve three stakeholders, the literature has not yet recognised the importance of each of these roles in the students' progressional development in the workplace. This paper outlines these roles and identifies seven ways the approach can be incorportaed into the pratices of an expereintial learning program.

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • Cord, B., Sykes, C. & Clements, M. (2011). Who cares wins: owning the learning transition. Development and Learning in Organizations: an international journal, 25 (4), 20-22.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-79959627278

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 2

Start Page


  • 20

End Page


  • 22

Volume


  • 25

Issue


  • 4

Abstract


  • Purpose – Higher education is seeking ways to close the perceived gap between employer's expectations of graduates and the current preparation these graduates receive. Experiential learning programs offer students one such opportunity to develop professionally and acquire generic workplace skills. This transition however, from the classroom to the workplace, can be a challenging process for students, and is the focus of this paper.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper discusses the importance of programs and their supervisors integrating “caring” into work placements. Several stages of the transition process are discussed before seven principles of a successful student transition are outlined.

    Findings – This paper demonstrates how a beyond duty of care approach can be adopted in experiential learning programs through seven key principles.

    Practical implications – It is anticipated that prioritizing a transition that enlarges the notion of student “care” and adoption of the seven key principles will narrow the perceived gap between employers and higher education's expectations of graduates.

    Originality/value – While experiential learning programs involve three stakeholders, the literature has not yet recognised the importance of each of these roles in the students' progressional development in the workplace. This paper outlines these roles and identifies seven ways the approach can be incorportaed into the pratices of an expereintial learning program.

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • Cord, B., Sykes, C. & Clements, M. (2011). Who cares wins: owning the learning transition. Development and Learning in Organizations: an international journal, 25 (4), 20-22.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-79959627278

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 2

Start Page


  • 20

End Page


  • 22

Volume


  • 25

Issue


  • 4