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Introduction: Television and the national

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Free-to-air television, programmed for local and national audiences, continues to be an

    important part of the media landscape despite the multiple modes of delivery and

    consumption which define the post-broadcast era. While television has long been

    characterized by the transnational flow of programs and formats, there is an argument to be

    made that ‘the national’ remains vital not only to television studies but to networks,

    producers, regulators and consumers. In addition, the national specificity of broadcast

    television—as ‘a forum for working through social pressures as well as sharing social

    pleasures’ (Ellis 2000, 176)—is evident to any viewer trying to stay in touch with the

    minutiae behind the ‘news from home’ while travelling or working abroad. A recent case

    in point might be the ousting of Australian Opposition leader Malcolm Turnbull by Tony

    Abbott at the end of 2009: while the ‘budgie’ in the pair of Speedos was circulated by the

    media as a national joke at Abbott’s expense, the pleasurable sharing of the joke depended

    upon familiarity with Australian popular culture as well as Australian politics. It is

    precisely such incongruities—between ephemeral and consequential instances of the

    national in the same media story—that informs much of the writing in this issue on

    Television and the National.

Authors


  •   Bye, Susan (external author)
  •   Collins, Felicity (external author)
  •   Turnbull, Sue

Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • Bye, S., Collins, F. & Turnbull, S. 2010, 'Introduction: Television and the national', Continuum: Journal of Media and Cultural Studies, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 339-341.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-77958163856

Number Of Pages


  • 2

Start Page


  • 339

End Page


  • 341

Volume


  • 24

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • Australia

Abstract


  • Free-to-air television, programmed for local and national audiences, continues to be an

    important part of the media landscape despite the multiple modes of delivery and

    consumption which define the post-broadcast era. While television has long been

    characterized by the transnational flow of programs and formats, there is an argument to be

    made that ‘the national’ remains vital not only to television studies but to networks,

    producers, regulators and consumers. In addition, the national specificity of broadcast

    television—as ‘a forum for working through social pressures as well as sharing social

    pleasures’ (Ellis 2000, 176)—is evident to any viewer trying to stay in touch with the

    minutiae behind the ‘news from home’ while travelling or working abroad. A recent case

    in point might be the ousting of Australian Opposition leader Malcolm Turnbull by Tony

    Abbott at the end of 2009: while the ‘budgie’ in the pair of Speedos was circulated by the

    media as a national joke at Abbott’s expense, the pleasurable sharing of the joke depended

    upon familiarity with Australian popular culture as well as Australian politics. It is

    precisely such incongruities—between ephemeral and consequential instances of the

    national in the same media story—that informs much of the writing in this issue on

    Television and the National.

Authors


  •   Bye, Susan (external author)
  •   Collins, Felicity (external author)
  •   Turnbull, Sue

Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • Bye, S., Collins, F. & Turnbull, S. 2010, 'Introduction: Television and the national', Continuum: Journal of Media and Cultural Studies, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 339-341.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-77958163856

Number Of Pages


  • 2

Start Page


  • 339

End Page


  • 341

Volume


  • 24

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • Australia