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Easy task first? Roles of metacognitive computer skills training strategies depend on how training tasks are sequenced

Journal Article


Abstract


  • This paper examined whether or not the effects of training strategies on inexperienced computer spreadsheet users’ errors and task performance are related to how tasks are sequenced during an introductory training session. In a partial replication of Caputi, Chan, and Jayasuriya (in press) with modified task sequencing, 51 participants underwent a introductory spreadsheet training session that entailed a counterfactual thinking strategy, and error management strategy, or a combination of both strategies. Participants completed a hard task (assessing adaptive transfer) followed by an easy task (assessing near transfer of skills learned). Contrary to Caputi et al.’s findings, participants in the error management only and combined conditions showed significant improvement in task performance from the hard to the easy task, and previously established correlations between errors and task performance for training strategies that included a counterfactual thinking component were not evident in this study. These findings indicate that the impact of computer skills training strategies on training outcomes may partly depend on how learning tasks are sequenced.

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • Chan, A. YC., Caputi, P. & Jayasuriya, R. (2011). Easy task first? Roles of metacognitive computer skills training strategies depend on how training tasks are sequenced. British Journal of Educational Technology, 42 (4), E71-E75.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-79958183346

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/3556

Start Page


  • E71

End Page


  • E75

Volume


  • 42

Issue


  • 4

Abstract


  • This paper examined whether or not the effects of training strategies on inexperienced computer spreadsheet users’ errors and task performance are related to how tasks are sequenced during an introductory training session. In a partial replication of Caputi, Chan, and Jayasuriya (in press) with modified task sequencing, 51 participants underwent a introductory spreadsheet training session that entailed a counterfactual thinking strategy, and error management strategy, or a combination of both strategies. Participants completed a hard task (assessing adaptive transfer) followed by an easy task (assessing near transfer of skills learned). Contrary to Caputi et al.’s findings, participants in the error management only and combined conditions showed significant improvement in task performance from the hard to the easy task, and previously established correlations between errors and task performance for training strategies that included a counterfactual thinking component were not evident in this study. These findings indicate that the impact of computer skills training strategies on training outcomes may partly depend on how learning tasks are sequenced.

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • Chan, A. YC., Caputi, P. & Jayasuriya, R. (2011). Easy task first? Roles of metacognitive computer skills training strategies depend on how training tasks are sequenced. British Journal of Educational Technology, 42 (4), E71-E75.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-79958183346

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/3556

Start Page


  • E71

End Page


  • E75

Volume


  • 42

Issue


  • 4