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First-year preservice physical educators' approaches to laboratory-based anatomy assessment: How do they differ from their science-based counterparts?

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Anatomy courses are often required to deliver content to students from varied disciplines. Physical education students often have less exposure to pretertiary science and when faced with first-year

    anatomy, they are expected to mix with science-based students. This project compared learning strategies of physical education and science students in preparation for a laboratory assessment. All students were studying first-year anatomy as a core subject. The laboratory assessment was outlined and students were exposed to 14 varied learning methods. Students were then asked to voluntarily provide their responses to a survey statement; ‘‘When directly preparing for my laboratory assessment, I made use of the following study approaches to best enhance my learning.’’ In physical education (n = 80) and science (n = 250) cohorts, a 75% survey response rate was achieved. Compared to science, the physical education students: made less use of written text (P < 0.05) or self-drawn diagrams (P < 0.05), preferred to label copies of prepared published diagrams (P < 0.05), made less use of ‘‘terminology lists’’ (P < 0.05) and reported reduced private study in the laboratory (P < 0.05). Yet when provided with the opportunity to sit mock assessments, physical education student participation was higher (P < 0.05). In first-year anatomy, physical education students approach study and revision in an ‘‘economical fashion.’’ In addition, physical education students prefer modes of learning that differ from science students. This may be due to their reduced familiarity of science terminology. Thus to maximize the learning of all students, it is important that a wide variety of teaching strategies are implemented when delivering anatomical science.

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • Peoples, G. (2011). First-year preservice physical educators' approaches to laboratory-based anatomy assessment: How do they differ from their science-based counterparts?. Clinical Anatomy, 24 (3), 404-405.

Number Of Pages


  • 1

Start Page


  • 404

End Page


  • 405

Volume


  • 24

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ca.21157/pdf

Abstract


  • Anatomy courses are often required to deliver content to students from varied disciplines. Physical education students often have less exposure to pretertiary science and when faced with first-year

    anatomy, they are expected to mix with science-based students. This project compared learning strategies of physical education and science students in preparation for a laboratory assessment. All students were studying first-year anatomy as a core subject. The laboratory assessment was outlined and students were exposed to 14 varied learning methods. Students were then asked to voluntarily provide their responses to a survey statement; ‘‘When directly preparing for my laboratory assessment, I made use of the following study approaches to best enhance my learning.’’ In physical education (n = 80) and science (n = 250) cohorts, a 75% survey response rate was achieved. Compared to science, the physical education students: made less use of written text (P < 0.05) or self-drawn diagrams (P < 0.05), preferred to label copies of prepared published diagrams (P < 0.05), made less use of ‘‘terminology lists’’ (P < 0.05) and reported reduced private study in the laboratory (P < 0.05). Yet when provided with the opportunity to sit mock assessments, physical education student participation was higher (P < 0.05). In first-year anatomy, physical education students approach study and revision in an ‘‘economical fashion.’’ In addition, physical education students prefer modes of learning that differ from science students. This may be due to their reduced familiarity of science terminology. Thus to maximize the learning of all students, it is important that a wide variety of teaching strategies are implemented when delivering anatomical science.

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • Peoples, G. (2011). First-year preservice physical educators' approaches to laboratory-based anatomy assessment: How do they differ from their science-based counterparts?. Clinical Anatomy, 24 (3), 404-405.

Number Of Pages


  • 1

Start Page


  • 404

End Page


  • 405

Volume


  • 24

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ca.21157/pdf