Skip to main content
placeholder image

Incorporating TGFU into a Bachelor of Physical and Health Education degree at an Australian university

Conference Paper


Download full-text (Open Access)

Abstract


  • Pearson and Webb (2010) investigated whether Physical Educators in NSW schools had adopted the TGfU approach to the teaching of games in their classes. Forty PDHPE teachers were surveyed with questionnaires and focus group interviews to determine their knowledge and understanding of TGfU and the extent to which they had incorporated TGfU into their teaching of games in Years 7 to 10. Fifty third-year Physical and Health Education pre-service teachers were also surveyed after completing their Professional Experience in the schools of the teachers surveyed. The pre-service teachers’ observations of Physical Education classes in the schools were also used to determine the extent that TGfU was being used in the teaching of games within those schools. It was concluded that the integration of TGfU into the NSW secondary school physical education curriculum has so far been unsuccessful.

    For TGfU to become more commonplace in the teaching of games in schools, it needs to have a solid base in pre-service teacher education programs. While the Faculty of Education offered a four year Bachelor of Education (Physical and Health Education) for many years, the new Bachelor of Physical and Health Education responded to a number of influences that emerged during the life of the previous program. One of the decisions was to firmly embed TGfU throughout the movement and pedagogy strands of the new degree. This paper discusses how TGfU has been incorporated across subjects within the new course structure. Core subjects that explore the pedagogical basis of TGfU with specific links to programming of games teaching and Professional Experience for pre-service teachers are examined. It is anticipated that with a strong focus on TGfU throughout the new Bachelor of Physical and Health Education program, TGfU will become much more commonplace in the teaching of games in NSW schools.

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • Pearson, P. J. & Webb, P. I. (2011). Incorporating TGFU into a Bachelor of Physical and Health Education degree at an Australian university. In G. Dodd (Eds.), Proceedings of the 27th ACHPER International Conference (pp. 45-56). South Australia: ACHPER.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1671&context=edupapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/edupapers/357

Start Page


  • 45

End Page


  • 56

Place Of Publication


  • http://www.achper.org.au/conferences-events/2011-conference-proceedings

Abstract


  • Pearson and Webb (2010) investigated whether Physical Educators in NSW schools had adopted the TGfU approach to the teaching of games in their classes. Forty PDHPE teachers were surveyed with questionnaires and focus group interviews to determine their knowledge and understanding of TGfU and the extent to which they had incorporated TGfU into their teaching of games in Years 7 to 10. Fifty third-year Physical and Health Education pre-service teachers were also surveyed after completing their Professional Experience in the schools of the teachers surveyed. The pre-service teachers’ observations of Physical Education classes in the schools were also used to determine the extent that TGfU was being used in the teaching of games within those schools. It was concluded that the integration of TGfU into the NSW secondary school physical education curriculum has so far been unsuccessful.

    For TGfU to become more commonplace in the teaching of games in schools, it needs to have a solid base in pre-service teacher education programs. While the Faculty of Education offered a four year Bachelor of Education (Physical and Health Education) for many years, the new Bachelor of Physical and Health Education responded to a number of influences that emerged during the life of the previous program. One of the decisions was to firmly embed TGfU throughout the movement and pedagogy strands of the new degree. This paper discusses how TGfU has been incorporated across subjects within the new course structure. Core subjects that explore the pedagogical basis of TGfU with specific links to programming of games teaching and Professional Experience for pre-service teachers are examined. It is anticipated that with a strong focus on TGfU throughout the new Bachelor of Physical and Health Education program, TGfU will become much more commonplace in the teaching of games in NSW schools.

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • Pearson, P. J. & Webb, P. I. (2011). Incorporating TGFU into a Bachelor of Physical and Health Education degree at an Australian university. In G. Dodd (Eds.), Proceedings of the 27th ACHPER International Conference (pp. 45-56). South Australia: ACHPER.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1671&context=edupapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/edupapers/357

Start Page


  • 45

End Page


  • 56

Place Of Publication


  • http://www.achper.org.au/conferences-events/2011-conference-proceedings