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Linking measured carbon dioxide exchange by sugarcane crops and biomass production

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • CARBON TRADING and the growing interest in biofuel production from

    sugarcane necessitate the ability to measure gains and losses of soil

    organic C which may occur as a result. Modelling and soil sampling

    suggest that changes in soil C are likely to be < 1 t C/ha/y. Published

    accounts indicate that confirming such small changes by traditional soil

    sampling is error-prone and requires investigations of > 10 years. The

    paper explores the possibility of calculating soil gains or losses by

    subtracting the carbon stored in the crop biomass from the carbon gained

    by the crop through the uptake of carbon dioxide supplied by the

    atmosphere and processes in the soil. Although uptake and storage very

    nearly balanced each other in one–year measurements in each of two

    sugarcane crops for which carbon turnover differed by a factor of 2, it

    was concluded that errors and uncertainties in the measurements and

    calculations were presently too large to detect the small differences in the

    gain or loss of soil C claimed for different management practices or

    predicted by modelling, at least in the short term.

Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • Denmead, O., Macdonald, B., White, I., Griffith, D. W., Bryant, G., Naylor, T. A., Wilson, S. R. & Wang, W. J. (2010). Linking measured carbon dioxide exchange by sugarcane crops and biomass production. Proceedings of the Australian Society of Sugar Cane Technologists, 32 286-292.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1803&context=scipapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/scipapers/764

Number Of Pages


  • 6

Start Page


  • 286

End Page


  • 292

Volume


  • 32

Abstract


  • CARBON TRADING and the growing interest in biofuel production from

    sugarcane necessitate the ability to measure gains and losses of soil

    organic C which may occur as a result. Modelling and soil sampling

    suggest that changes in soil C are likely to be < 1 t C/ha/y. Published

    accounts indicate that confirming such small changes by traditional soil

    sampling is error-prone and requires investigations of > 10 years. The

    paper explores the possibility of calculating soil gains or losses by

    subtracting the carbon stored in the crop biomass from the carbon gained

    by the crop through the uptake of carbon dioxide supplied by the

    atmosphere and processes in the soil. Although uptake and storage very

    nearly balanced each other in one–year measurements in each of two

    sugarcane crops for which carbon turnover differed by a factor of 2, it

    was concluded that errors and uncertainties in the measurements and

    calculations were presently too large to detect the small differences in the

    gain or loss of soil C claimed for different management practices or

    predicted by modelling, at least in the short term.

Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • Denmead, O., Macdonald, B., White, I., Griffith, D. W., Bryant, G., Naylor, T. A., Wilson, S. R. & Wang, W. J. (2010). Linking measured carbon dioxide exchange by sugarcane crops and biomass production. Proceedings of the Australian Society of Sugar Cane Technologists, 32 286-292.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1803&context=scipapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/scipapers/764

Number Of Pages


  • 6

Start Page


  • 286

End Page


  • 292

Volume


  • 32