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How will climate change alter fishery governance? Insights from seven international case studies

Journal Article


Abstract


  • We examine the implications of climate change for fishery governance using seven international fishery

    case studies in low, mid and high latitudes, including eastern Australia, the western Pacific Ocean,

    Alaska, west coast United States, Hawaii, west coast Canada and France. Climate change adds

    uncertainty about fish stock productivity, migratory patterns, trophic interactions and vulnerability of

    fish populations to fishing pressure.

    Fishery governance has to address additional uncertainty from climate change in both the system

    being governed and the governance systems. The case studies reveal governance issues that indicate

    adaptation will involve more flexible fishery management regimes, schemes for capacity adjustment,

    catch limitation and alternative fishing livelihoods for fishers.

    Where fishery governance systems have been less developed, fisheries are less able to adapt to

    climate change impacts. Adaptation involves addressing some of the most intractable allocation issues

    of fisheries management.

Authors


  •   McIlgorm, Alistair
  •   Hanna, Susan (external author)
  •   Millerd, Frank (external author)
  •   Le Floc'H, Pascal (external author)
  •   Pan, Minling (external author)
  •   Knapp, Gunnar (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • McIlgorm, A., Hanna, S., Millerd, F., Le Floc'H, P., Pan, M. & Knapp, G. (2010). How will climate change alter fishery governance? Insights from seven international case studies. Marine Policy, 34 (1), 170-177.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-70349616123

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lawpapers/694

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 7

Start Page


  • 170

End Page


  • 177

Volume


  • 34

Issue


  • 1

Abstract


  • We examine the implications of climate change for fishery governance using seven international fishery

    case studies in low, mid and high latitudes, including eastern Australia, the western Pacific Ocean,

    Alaska, west coast United States, Hawaii, west coast Canada and France. Climate change adds

    uncertainty about fish stock productivity, migratory patterns, trophic interactions and vulnerability of

    fish populations to fishing pressure.

    Fishery governance has to address additional uncertainty from climate change in both the system

    being governed and the governance systems. The case studies reveal governance issues that indicate

    adaptation will involve more flexible fishery management regimes, schemes for capacity adjustment,

    catch limitation and alternative fishing livelihoods for fishers.

    Where fishery governance systems have been less developed, fisheries are less able to adapt to

    climate change impacts. Adaptation involves addressing some of the most intractable allocation issues

    of fisheries management.

Authors


  •   McIlgorm, Alistair
  •   Hanna, Susan (external author)
  •   Millerd, Frank (external author)
  •   Le Floc'H, Pascal (external author)
  •   Pan, Minling (external author)
  •   Knapp, Gunnar (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • McIlgorm, A., Hanna, S., Millerd, F., Le Floc'H, P., Pan, M. & Knapp, G. (2010). How will climate change alter fishery governance? Insights from seven international case studies. Marine Policy, 34 (1), 170-177.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-70349616123

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lawpapers/694

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 7

Start Page


  • 170

End Page


  • 177

Volume


  • 34

Issue


  • 1