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Depth interval estimates from motion parallax and binocular disparity beyond interaction space

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Static and dynamic observers provided binocular and monocular estimates of the depths between real objects lying well beyond interaction space. On each trial, pairs of LEDs were presented inside a dark railway tunnel. The nearest LED was always 40 m from the observer, with the depth separation between LED pairs ranging from 0 up to 248 m. Dynamic binocular viewing was found to produce the greatest (ie most veridical) estimates of depth magnitude, followed next by static binocular viewing, and then by dynamic monocular viewing. (No significant depth was seen with static monocular viewing.) We found evidence that both binocular and monocular dynamic estimates of depth were scaled for the observation distance when the ground plane and walls of the tunnel were visible up to the nearest LED. We conclude that both motion parallax and stereopsis provide useful long-distance depth information and that motion parallax information can enhance the degree of stereoscopic depth seen.

UOW Authors


  •   Gillam, Barbara (external author)
  •   Palmisano, Stephen
  •   Govan, Donovan G. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • Gillam, B., Palmisano, S. A. & Govan, D. G. (2011). Depth interval estimates from motion parallax and binocular disparity beyond interaction space. Perception, 40 (1), 39-49.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-79952086066

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4570&context=hbspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/3518

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 10

Start Page


  • 39

End Page


  • 49

Volume


  • 40

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • Static and dynamic observers provided binocular and monocular estimates of the depths between real objects lying well beyond interaction space. On each trial, pairs of LEDs were presented inside a dark railway tunnel. The nearest LED was always 40 m from the observer, with the depth separation between LED pairs ranging from 0 up to 248 m. Dynamic binocular viewing was found to produce the greatest (ie most veridical) estimates of depth magnitude, followed next by static binocular viewing, and then by dynamic monocular viewing. (No significant depth was seen with static monocular viewing.) We found evidence that both binocular and monocular dynamic estimates of depth were scaled for the observation distance when the ground plane and walls of the tunnel were visible up to the nearest LED. We conclude that both motion parallax and stereopsis provide useful long-distance depth information and that motion parallax information can enhance the degree of stereoscopic depth seen.

UOW Authors


  •   Gillam, Barbara (external author)
  •   Palmisano, Stephen
  •   Govan, Donovan G. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • Gillam, B., Palmisano, S. A. & Govan, D. G. (2011). Depth interval estimates from motion parallax and binocular disparity beyond interaction space. Perception, 40 (1), 39-49.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-79952086066

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4570&context=hbspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/3518

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 10

Start Page


  • 39

End Page


  • 49

Volume


  • 40

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom