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Cenozoic development of the lapstone structural complex, Sydney Basin, New South Wales

Journal Article


Abstract


  • The Lapstone Structural Complex is an association of monoclines and high-angle reverse faults that occupies the frontal ridge of the lower Blue Mountains, west of Sydney. Permian-Triassic movements have been proposed on the basis of unpublished seismic profiles reportedly showing abrupt stratigraphic thickness variations in the Sydney Basin succession across the Lapstone Structural Complex and indicative of syn-depositional deformation. In a companion paper, we present an interpretation of recently reprocessed seismic data and show that the Lapstone Structural Complex played no role during Sydney Basin sedimentation. Paleomagnetic data collected from two monoclines are interpreted to bracket development of the Lapstone Structural Complex within the mid-Cretaceous to Miocene interval. Cenozoic uplift of the frontal ridge of the lower Blue Mountains is shown by uplifted semi-consolidated gravels (Rickabys Creek Gravel). A Paleogene timing of uplift was proposed from modelling of landscape development. Association of structures of the Lapstone Structural Complex with the uplifted lower Blue Mountains is most simply explained by a Paleogene age for these structures. Evidence for additional neotectonic activity along the Lapstone Structural Complex reflects the modern compressive stress regime associated with the transpressional plate boundary in the South Island of New Zealand. A Paleogene age for the uplift of the Blue Mountains is consistent with the high relief of this region in contrast to more stable regions of the highlands of eastern Australia characterised by low local relief, reflecting antiquity

Authors


Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • Fergusson, C. L., Bray, A. & Hatherly, P. (2011). Cenozoic development of the lapstone structural complex, Sydney Basin, New South Wales. Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, 58 (1), 49-59.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-78951477572

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/scipapers/5240

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 10

Start Page


  • 49

End Page


  • 59

Volume


  • 58

Issue


  • 1

Abstract


  • The Lapstone Structural Complex is an association of monoclines and high-angle reverse faults that occupies the frontal ridge of the lower Blue Mountains, west of Sydney. Permian-Triassic movements have been proposed on the basis of unpublished seismic profiles reportedly showing abrupt stratigraphic thickness variations in the Sydney Basin succession across the Lapstone Structural Complex and indicative of syn-depositional deformation. In a companion paper, we present an interpretation of recently reprocessed seismic data and show that the Lapstone Structural Complex played no role during Sydney Basin sedimentation. Paleomagnetic data collected from two monoclines are interpreted to bracket development of the Lapstone Structural Complex within the mid-Cretaceous to Miocene interval. Cenozoic uplift of the frontal ridge of the lower Blue Mountains is shown by uplifted semi-consolidated gravels (Rickabys Creek Gravel). A Paleogene timing of uplift was proposed from modelling of landscape development. Association of structures of the Lapstone Structural Complex with the uplifted lower Blue Mountains is most simply explained by a Paleogene age for these structures. Evidence for additional neotectonic activity along the Lapstone Structural Complex reflects the modern compressive stress regime associated with the transpressional plate boundary in the South Island of New Zealand. A Paleogene age for the uplift of the Blue Mountains is consistent with the high relief of this region in contrast to more stable regions of the highlands of eastern Australia characterised by low local relief, reflecting antiquity

Authors


Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • Fergusson, C. L., Bray, A. & Hatherly, P. (2011). Cenozoic development of the lapstone structural complex, Sydney Basin, New South Wales. Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, 58 (1), 49-59.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-78951477572

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/scipapers/5240

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 10

Start Page


  • 49

End Page


  • 59

Volume


  • 58

Issue


  • 1