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Teaching anatomy in an increasingly crowded medical curriculum: a survey of current practices

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Changes to medical education include a proliferation of medical

    schools, shorter courses, shifts toward problem-based learning, and

    large-scale medical knowledge expansion. Students also spend less

    time on university campuses and more time at clinical teaching sites

    1026 Abstracts

    which are often non-specialized, regional, and remote from the parent

    university. These changes leave little room for teaching anatomy

    as a pure discipline. The aim of this research was to analyze contemporary

    anatomy teaching and assessment in Australasian medical

    schools. An online questionnaire/survey was competed by 19 Australian

    and New Zealand medical schools, examining the time-allocation,

    content, delivery and assessment of anatomy for 2008. The results

    indicate that considerable variability exists within the current delivery

    of anatomical education in Australasian medical schools. This is an indication

    of the current climate in which basic sciences, including gross

    anatomy, are taught in Australian and New Zealand medical schools.

    There is no national curriculum for the teaching of gross anatomy;

    the instruction and assessment of gross anatomy is entirely at the

    discretion of each individual institution. Currently, without reliable

    evidence, the degree of divergence between anatomy curricula at the

    various Australasian medical schools is unclear. The questionnaire

    survey findings have clarified this, and could be used to inform a

    Royal Australian College of Surgeons policy or consensus statement

    on anatomy teaching in our medical schools. A clinically integrated

    approach to teaching anatomy has been developed to extend anatomy

    teaching from a pure to a clinically integrated discipline, providing

    a pedagogical benefit to anatomical and surgical educators.

Authors


  •   McAndrew, Darryl J.
  •   Craig, Steven J. (external author)
  •   Boers, David (external author)
  •   Tait, Noel (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • McAndrew, D. J., Craig, S. J., Boers, D. & Tait, N. (2010). Teaching anatomy in an increasingly crowded medical curriculum: a survey of current practices. In Abstracts Presented at the Joint Meeting of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (27th Annual Meeting) and the International Society for Plastination (15th Annual Meeting) in Honolulu, Hawaii, July 20-23, 2010, 2010, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. Clinical Anatomy, 23 (8), 1026-1027.

Number Of Pages


  • 1

Start Page


  • 1026

End Page


  • 1027

Volume


  • 23

Issue


  • 8

Abstract


  • Changes to medical education include a proliferation of medical

    schools, shorter courses, shifts toward problem-based learning, and

    large-scale medical knowledge expansion. Students also spend less

    time on university campuses and more time at clinical teaching sites

    1026 Abstracts

    which are often non-specialized, regional, and remote from the parent

    university. These changes leave little room for teaching anatomy

    as a pure discipline. The aim of this research was to analyze contemporary

    anatomy teaching and assessment in Australasian medical

    schools. An online questionnaire/survey was competed by 19 Australian

    and New Zealand medical schools, examining the time-allocation,

    content, delivery and assessment of anatomy for 2008. The results

    indicate that considerable variability exists within the current delivery

    of anatomical education in Australasian medical schools. This is an indication

    of the current climate in which basic sciences, including gross

    anatomy, are taught in Australian and New Zealand medical schools.

    There is no national curriculum for the teaching of gross anatomy;

    the instruction and assessment of gross anatomy is entirely at the

    discretion of each individual institution. Currently, without reliable

    evidence, the degree of divergence between anatomy curricula at the

    various Australasian medical schools is unclear. The questionnaire

    survey findings have clarified this, and could be used to inform a

    Royal Australian College of Surgeons policy or consensus statement

    on anatomy teaching in our medical schools. A clinically integrated

    approach to teaching anatomy has been developed to extend anatomy

    teaching from a pure to a clinically integrated discipline, providing

    a pedagogical benefit to anatomical and surgical educators.

Authors


  •   McAndrew, Darryl J.
  •   Craig, Steven J. (external author)
  •   Boers, David (external author)
  •   Tait, Noel (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • McAndrew, D. J., Craig, S. J., Boers, D. & Tait, N. (2010). Teaching anatomy in an increasingly crowded medical curriculum: a survey of current practices. In Abstracts Presented at the Joint Meeting of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (27th Annual Meeting) and the International Society for Plastination (15th Annual Meeting) in Honolulu, Hawaii, July 20-23, 2010, 2010, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. Clinical Anatomy, 23 (8), 1026-1027.

Number Of Pages


  • 1

Start Page


  • 1026

End Page


  • 1027

Volume


  • 23

Issue


  • 8