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An example of the integration of anatomical and clinical skills education within a medical curriculum

Journal Article


Abstract


  • The desire and drive to integrate the many components of a modern

    day medical curriculum poses a considerable dilemma for academics.

    One such task is the integration of anatomical and clinical skills education.

    Medical students at the Graduate School of Medicine, University of

    Wollongong attended, within a two week Case Based Learning scenario,

    two practical based anatomy sessions on limb musculature and peripheral

    nerves and a clinical skills session on the neurological examination

    of the upper and lower limbs. To design a series of sessions to provide

    the student with a sound understanding of the relevant anatomy and

    the practical skills required for a competent examination, with the overall

    clinical learning objective based around peripheral nerve lesions.

    Anatomy sessions occurred within the wet lab and utilized a station format,

    which students rotated through for the 2 hr session. Students

    completed three tasks at each station: muscle and nerve identification,

    myotome distribution (motor supply) and dermatome distribution (sensory

    reception). Learning tasks were supported with cadaveric specimens,

    models, and diagrams. Clinical skills sessions comprised of a

    brief discussion of the importance of the neurological examination of

    the upper and lower limbs, its technique and the relevant anatomical

    and physiological principles, a tutor demonstration of the examination

    with running commentary and explanation and then extended student

    practice of the examination technique on each other and patient volunteers.

    By contextualising medical curriculum content, through the integration

    of anatomy and clinical skills, overall student performance in

    clinical competency examinations were enhanced.

Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • McAndrew, D. J., Larkin, T. & Brown, L. (2010). An example of the integration of anatomical and clinical skills education within a medical curriculum. In Abstracts Presented at the Joint Meeting of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (27th Annual Meeting) and the International Society for Plastination (15th Annual Meeting) in Honolulu, Hawaii, July 20-23, 2010, 20-23 July 2010, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. Clinical Anatomy, 23 (8), 1026-1026.

Number Of Pages


  • 0

Start Page


  • 1026

End Page


  • 1026

Volume


  • 23

Issue


  • 8

Abstract


  • The desire and drive to integrate the many components of a modern

    day medical curriculum poses a considerable dilemma for academics.

    One such task is the integration of anatomical and clinical skills education.

    Medical students at the Graduate School of Medicine, University of

    Wollongong attended, within a two week Case Based Learning scenario,

    two practical based anatomy sessions on limb musculature and peripheral

    nerves and a clinical skills session on the neurological examination

    of the upper and lower limbs. To design a series of sessions to provide

    the student with a sound understanding of the relevant anatomy and

    the practical skills required for a competent examination, with the overall

    clinical learning objective based around peripheral nerve lesions.

    Anatomy sessions occurred within the wet lab and utilized a station format,

    which students rotated through for the 2 hr session. Students

    completed three tasks at each station: muscle and nerve identification,

    myotome distribution (motor supply) and dermatome distribution (sensory

    reception). Learning tasks were supported with cadaveric specimens,

    models, and diagrams. Clinical skills sessions comprised of a

    brief discussion of the importance of the neurological examination of

    the upper and lower limbs, its technique and the relevant anatomical

    and physiological principles, a tutor demonstration of the examination

    with running commentary and explanation and then extended student

    practice of the examination technique on each other and patient volunteers.

    By contextualising medical curriculum content, through the integration

    of anatomy and clinical skills, overall student performance in

    clinical competency examinations were enhanced.

Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • McAndrew, D. J., Larkin, T. & Brown, L. (2010). An example of the integration of anatomical and clinical skills education within a medical curriculum. In Abstracts Presented at the Joint Meeting of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (27th Annual Meeting) and the International Society for Plastination (15th Annual Meeting) in Honolulu, Hawaii, July 20-23, 2010, 20-23 July 2010, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. Clinical Anatomy, 23 (8), 1026-1026.

Number Of Pages


  • 0

Start Page


  • 1026

End Page


  • 1026

Volume


  • 23

Issue


  • 8