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Student perceptions of an anatomy dissection experience before and after hospital rotation plecements

Journal Article


Abstract


  • In our 4-year Medical Degree, the only laboratory-based formal anatomy

    teaching occurs in the first 1.5 years, which are medical sciencebased.

    Cadaveric prosections and models are the predominant teaching

    aids; whole body dissection is not used. The final 2.5 years of the

    degree are clinical-based, consisting of hospital rotation placements

    with an ever decreasing medical science curriculum component.

    Without an integrated practical anatomy component during the final

    2.5 years, it is essential that students have sufficient anatomical

    knowledge prior to, and an ability to apply this to patient cases during,

    their hospital rounds. We trialled a 3 week guided ‘‘Dissection Experience’’

    for students, timetabled to occur prior to the hospital rotations.

    Specifically, students dissected a cubital fossa, femoral triangle

    and subclavian region to enhance their regional anatomical knowledge

    of these clinically-relevant areas. Students were further encouraged

    to open and explore the abdominal and thorax cavities. Students

    were surveyed at the end of the 3 week dissection block and

    again after their 2nd year hospital rotations on their perceptions of

    the usefulness and relevance of these skills in their hospital rotations.

    Student feedback was very positive with students thriving in this

    more investigative learning environment. Student visualization and

    subsequent discussion of 3D concepts was a highlight. Previous anatomical

    knowledge was reinforced in addition to an increased understanding

    of skin layers, fascias and anatomical relations of structures.

    To prepare students for their hospital rotation placements, dissection

    experience is useful in understanding the anatomical underpinning of

    medical knowledge and its clinical application.

Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • Larkin, T. & McAndrew, D. J. (2010). Student perceptions of an anatomy dissection experience before and after hospital rotation plecements. In AAbstracts Presented at the Joint Meeting of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (27th Annual Meeting) and the International Society for Plastination (15th Annual Meeting) in Honolulu, Hawaii, July 20-23, 2010, July 2010, Hawaii, USA. Clinical Anatomy, 23 1021-1021.

Number Of Pages


  • 0

Start Page


  • 1021

End Page


  • 1021

Volume


  • 23

Abstract


  • In our 4-year Medical Degree, the only laboratory-based formal anatomy

    teaching occurs in the first 1.5 years, which are medical sciencebased.

    Cadaveric prosections and models are the predominant teaching

    aids; whole body dissection is not used. The final 2.5 years of the

    degree are clinical-based, consisting of hospital rotation placements

    with an ever decreasing medical science curriculum component.

    Without an integrated practical anatomy component during the final

    2.5 years, it is essential that students have sufficient anatomical

    knowledge prior to, and an ability to apply this to patient cases during,

    their hospital rounds. We trialled a 3 week guided ‘‘Dissection Experience’’

    for students, timetabled to occur prior to the hospital rotations.

    Specifically, students dissected a cubital fossa, femoral triangle

    and subclavian region to enhance their regional anatomical knowledge

    of these clinically-relevant areas. Students were further encouraged

    to open and explore the abdominal and thorax cavities. Students

    were surveyed at the end of the 3 week dissection block and

    again after their 2nd year hospital rotations on their perceptions of

    the usefulness and relevance of these skills in their hospital rotations.

    Student feedback was very positive with students thriving in this

    more investigative learning environment. Student visualization and

    subsequent discussion of 3D concepts was a highlight. Previous anatomical

    knowledge was reinforced in addition to an increased understanding

    of skin layers, fascias and anatomical relations of structures.

    To prepare students for their hospital rotation placements, dissection

    experience is useful in understanding the anatomical underpinning of

    medical knowledge and its clinical application.

Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • Larkin, T. & McAndrew, D. J. (2010). Student perceptions of an anatomy dissection experience before and after hospital rotation plecements. In AAbstracts Presented at the Joint Meeting of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (27th Annual Meeting) and the International Society for Plastination (15th Annual Meeting) in Honolulu, Hawaii, July 20-23, 2010, July 2010, Hawaii, USA. Clinical Anatomy, 23 1021-1021.

Number Of Pages


  • 0

Start Page


  • 1021

End Page


  • 1021

Volume


  • 23