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Medication alliance: development and implementation of a mental health staff training program for the enhancement of patient medication adherence

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Patient non-adherence to prescribed

    medications remains a major hurdle in the

    effective delivery of health care services for

    people experiencing chronic illnesses. Nonadherence

    rates are particularly high among

    those with major mental health problems. The

    aim of this research was to investigate barriers

    to the implementation of adherence

    interventions, in particular, clinician skills,

    attitudes and knowledge, as well as describing a

    potential strategy to overcome these barriers.

    This research incorporated three phases. Firstly,

    mental health clinicians were surveyed using a

    series of cross-sectional studies to investigate

    the relationship between their beliefs and

    knowledge with respect to medications and

    adherence, and their self reported efforts to

    enhance patient adherence. Secondly, a clinician

    training program (Medication Alliance) was

    developed based on belief and knowledge

    deficits found in phase one and this was

    evaluated with a sample of mental health

    professionals. In the third phase, a sample of

    patients with mental health problems were

    assessed for changes in adherence behaviour

    and mental health status following the training

    of their mental health care provider in

    Medication Alliance. The first phase of research

    indicated that poorer knowledge and more

    negative attitudes were associated with the

    extent to which mental health clinicians sought

    to enhance patient adherence. The second

    phase of research provided significant evidence

    that Medication Alliance training improved

    clinician skills (CBT), knowledge and attitudes

    with respect to the enhancement of patient

    adherence. In the third phase, the data indicated

    that patients of clinicians who had received

    Medication Alliance training experienced an

    improvement in both their adherence and their

    mental health. A model was developed from the

    data which explained this improvement in terms

    of the therapeutic alliance and patient insight.

    Efforts to enhance patient adherence to

    treatment should include a focus on the ‘frontline’

    clinicians delivering mental health services.

    Appropriate attention to clinician skills, attitudes

    and knowledge can enable the improvement of

    patient adherence to treatment. Larger studies

    across chronic health domains are needed to

    substantiate these findings.

Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • Byrne, M. K. (2010). Medication alliance: development and implementation of a mental health staff training program for the enhancement of patient medication adherence. In V. Mrowinski, M. Kyrios & N. Voudouris (Eds.), Abstracts of the 27th International Congress of Applied Psychology (p. 871). Melbourne: Australian Psychological Society.

Start Page


  • 871

Place Of Publication


  • Melbourne

Abstract


  • Patient non-adherence to prescribed

    medications remains a major hurdle in the

    effective delivery of health care services for

    people experiencing chronic illnesses. Nonadherence

    rates are particularly high among

    those with major mental health problems. The

    aim of this research was to investigate barriers

    to the implementation of adherence

    interventions, in particular, clinician skills,

    attitudes and knowledge, as well as describing a

    potential strategy to overcome these barriers.

    This research incorporated three phases. Firstly,

    mental health clinicians were surveyed using a

    series of cross-sectional studies to investigate

    the relationship between their beliefs and

    knowledge with respect to medications and

    adherence, and their self reported efforts to

    enhance patient adherence. Secondly, a clinician

    training program (Medication Alliance) was

    developed based on belief and knowledge

    deficits found in phase one and this was

    evaluated with a sample of mental health

    professionals. In the third phase, a sample of

    patients with mental health problems were

    assessed for changes in adherence behaviour

    and mental health status following the training

    of their mental health care provider in

    Medication Alliance. The first phase of research

    indicated that poorer knowledge and more

    negative attitudes were associated with the

    extent to which mental health clinicians sought

    to enhance patient adherence. The second

    phase of research provided significant evidence

    that Medication Alliance training improved

    clinician skills (CBT), knowledge and attitudes

    with respect to the enhancement of patient

    adherence. In the third phase, the data indicated

    that patients of clinicians who had received

    Medication Alliance training experienced an

    improvement in both their adherence and their

    mental health. A model was developed from the

    data which explained this improvement in terms

    of the therapeutic alliance and patient insight.

    Efforts to enhance patient adherence to

    treatment should include a focus on the ‘frontline’

    clinicians delivering mental health services.

    Appropriate attention to clinician skills, attitudes

    and knowledge can enable the improvement of

    patient adherence to treatment. Larger studies

    across chronic health domains are needed to

    substantiate these findings.

Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • Byrne, M. K. (2010). Medication alliance: development and implementation of a mental health staff training program for the enhancement of patient medication adherence. In V. Mrowinski, M. Kyrios & N. Voudouris (Eds.), Abstracts of the 27th International Congress of Applied Psychology (p. 871). Melbourne: Australian Psychological Society.

Start Page


  • 871

Place Of Publication


  • Melbourne