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Family carer attitudes toward medications are related to self-reported medication adherence amongst people with mental illness

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Others’ beliefs influence our own attitudes and

    behaviours. Parents in particular can affect their

    children’s behaviour by influencing their

    attitudes and cognitions. The aim of the present

    study was to explore the beliefs that family

    carers had toward medications and to determine

    whether these were related to the attitudes and

    medication adherence of their family member

    with mental illness (consumers). Forty adult

    carer-consumer dyads independently completed

    the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire

    (Horne, Weinman & Hankins, 1999), the Drug

    Attitudes Inventory (Hogan, Awad & Eastwood,

    1983) and measures of medication adherence.

    Carer and consumer attitudes toward

    medications were strongly positively correlated.

    Further, carer attitudes were significantly

    correlated with consumers’ self reported

    adherence. However, consumers’ own attitudes

    were more strongly related to their adherence

    ratings. Consumers and family carers had high

    levels of awareness of each other’s attitudes

    toward medications. The moderate relationship

    between carer and consumer attitudes

    highlights the need to target psycho-educational

    activities to increase adherence at both carers

    and consumers. There is also a need to better

    understand whether attitude transfer between

    carers and consumers is a two-way process.

Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • Deane, F. P., Byrne, M. K. & Mortimer, C. (2010). Family carer attitudes toward medications are related to self-reported medication adherence amongst people with mental illness. In V. Mrowinski, M. Kyrios & N. Voudouris (Eds.), Abstracts of the 27th International Congress of Applied Psychology (pp. 1154-1154). Melbourne, Victoria: Australian Psychological Society.

Start Page


  • 1154

End Page


  • 1154

Place Of Publication


  • Melbourne, Victoria

Abstract


  • Others’ beliefs influence our own attitudes and

    behaviours. Parents in particular can affect their

    children’s behaviour by influencing their

    attitudes and cognitions. The aim of the present

    study was to explore the beliefs that family

    carers had toward medications and to determine

    whether these were related to the attitudes and

    medication adherence of their family member

    with mental illness (consumers). Forty adult

    carer-consumer dyads independently completed

    the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire

    (Horne, Weinman & Hankins, 1999), the Drug

    Attitudes Inventory (Hogan, Awad & Eastwood,

    1983) and measures of medication adherence.

    Carer and consumer attitudes toward

    medications were strongly positively correlated.

    Further, carer attitudes were significantly

    correlated with consumers’ self reported

    adherence. However, consumers’ own attitudes

    were more strongly related to their adherence

    ratings. Consumers and family carers had high

    levels of awareness of each other’s attitudes

    toward medications. The moderate relationship

    between carer and consumer attitudes

    highlights the need to target psycho-educational

    activities to increase adherence at both carers

    and consumers. There is also a need to better

    understand whether attitude transfer between

    carers and consumers is a two-way process.

Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • Deane, F. P., Byrne, M. K. & Mortimer, C. (2010). Family carer attitudes toward medications are related to self-reported medication adherence amongst people with mental illness. In V. Mrowinski, M. Kyrios & N. Voudouris (Eds.), Abstracts of the 27th International Congress of Applied Psychology (pp. 1154-1154). Melbourne, Victoria: Australian Psychological Society.

Start Page


  • 1154

End Page


  • 1154

Place Of Publication


  • Melbourne, Victoria