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Understanding employee well-being practices in Australian organizations

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Research has shown that employee well-being is associated with a range of positive outcomes such as reduced stress and improved productivity. The aim of this study was to assess the awareness of Australian HR Managers of a broader range of concepts related to well-being and of the nature and prevalence of well-being programs in Australian organisations. An email invitation was sent to 3471 HR professionals in Australia of whom 319 responded to the online survey (9.2%). Findings indicate that Australian HR professionals offer a range of services related to emotional, intellectual, social and physical well-being, but only a minority include services related to spiritual well-being. Most respondents consider that the benefits of well-being programs outweigh the costs. However, the low response rate may suggest that many organisations do not yet recognise the importance of promoting well-being at work.

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • McCarthy, G., Almeida, S. J. & Ahrens, J. (2011). Understanding employee well-being practices in Australian organizations. International Journal of Health, Wellness & Society, 1 (1), 181-198.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/gsbpapers/295

Number Of Pages


  • 17

Start Page


  • 181

End Page


  • 198

Volume


  • 1

Issue


  • 1

Abstract


  • Research has shown that employee well-being is associated with a range of positive outcomes such as reduced stress and improved productivity. The aim of this study was to assess the awareness of Australian HR Managers of a broader range of concepts related to well-being and of the nature and prevalence of well-being programs in Australian organisations. An email invitation was sent to 3471 HR professionals in Australia of whom 319 responded to the online survey (9.2%). Findings indicate that Australian HR professionals offer a range of services related to emotional, intellectual, social and physical well-being, but only a minority include services related to spiritual well-being. Most respondents consider that the benefits of well-being programs outweigh the costs. However, the low response rate may suggest that many organisations do not yet recognise the importance of promoting well-being at work.

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • McCarthy, G., Almeida, S. J. & Ahrens, J. (2011). Understanding employee well-being practices in Australian organizations. International Journal of Health, Wellness & Society, 1 (1), 181-198.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/gsbpapers/295

Number Of Pages


  • 17

Start Page


  • 181

End Page


  • 198

Volume


  • 1

Issue


  • 1