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Seismic reflection evidence for the evolution of the Camden Syncline and Lapstone Structural Complex, central Sydney Basin, Australia

Journal Article


Abstract


  • The Camden Syncline and the Lapstone Structual Complex are two major geological features of the central Sydney Basin. We have interpreted over 500km (45 lines) of an unpublished recenty reprocessed seismic dataset as a means to elucidating the evolution of both features. Major horizons observed in the seismic data have been described and correlated with significant tectonic events that shaped the formation of the greater Sydney-Gunnedah-Bowen Basin; namely Early Permian extension, mid-Permian passive thermal subsidence and Late Permian to mid-Triassic foreland loading. Horizon mapping shows that the Camden Syncline is a broad north-northeast plunging structure whose western limb is truncated by the north-south trending faults and folds of the Lapstone Structural Complex. Furthermore, isochron maps reveal that the Late Permian to mid-Triassic sedimentary succession thickens towards the axis of the Camden Syncline, thus confirming it's role as a depocentre during this period of basin evolution. No abrupt thickening is observed in the Late Permian to mid-Triassic sedimentary succession in the vicinity of the Lapstone Structural Complex indicating that the Lapstone Structural Complex was formed subsequent to the deposition of the Permian-Triassic Sydney Basin sedimentary succession. Furthermore, our interpretation of the reprocessed seismic data confirms that the major structural style of the Lapstone Structural Complex is that of west dipping reverse faults and east facing monoclines.

Authors


Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • Bray, A., Hatherly, P. & Fergusson, C. L. (2010). Seismic reflection evidence for the evolution of the Camden Syncline and Lapstone Structural Complex, central Sydney Basin, Australia. Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, 57 (7), 993-1004.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-77957221204

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/scipapers/5136

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 11

Start Page


  • 993

End Page


  • 1004

Volume


  • 57

Issue


  • 7

Abstract


  • The Camden Syncline and the Lapstone Structual Complex are two major geological features of the central Sydney Basin. We have interpreted over 500km (45 lines) of an unpublished recenty reprocessed seismic dataset as a means to elucidating the evolution of both features. Major horizons observed in the seismic data have been described and correlated with significant tectonic events that shaped the formation of the greater Sydney-Gunnedah-Bowen Basin; namely Early Permian extension, mid-Permian passive thermal subsidence and Late Permian to mid-Triassic foreland loading. Horizon mapping shows that the Camden Syncline is a broad north-northeast plunging structure whose western limb is truncated by the north-south trending faults and folds of the Lapstone Structural Complex. Furthermore, isochron maps reveal that the Late Permian to mid-Triassic sedimentary succession thickens towards the axis of the Camden Syncline, thus confirming it's role as a depocentre during this period of basin evolution. No abrupt thickening is observed in the Late Permian to mid-Triassic sedimentary succession in the vicinity of the Lapstone Structural Complex indicating that the Lapstone Structural Complex was formed subsequent to the deposition of the Permian-Triassic Sydney Basin sedimentary succession. Furthermore, our interpretation of the reprocessed seismic data confirms that the major structural style of the Lapstone Structural Complex is that of west dipping reverse faults and east facing monoclines.

Authors


Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • Bray, A., Hatherly, P. & Fergusson, C. L. (2010). Seismic reflection evidence for the evolution of the Camden Syncline and Lapstone Structural Complex, central Sydney Basin, Australia. Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, 57 (7), 993-1004.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-77957221204

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/scipapers/5136

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 11

Start Page


  • 993

End Page


  • 1004

Volume


  • 57

Issue


  • 7