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An adaptive tunable dynamic absorber using MREs for vehicle powertrain transient vibration control

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • This paper presents a concept design of Adaptive Tuned Vibration Absorber (ATVA) using

    a magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) for powertrain transient vibration reduction over a frequency

    range. The MRE material used to develop the ATVA is a soft MRE whose components are a rubbery

    silicone polymer matrix and ferrous fillers in fraction of 27.6% by volume. For such a soft MRE the

    elastic modulus significantly increases due to an external magnetic field. During the transient stage,

    the powertrain experiences a period of high level vibration because the engine speed passes through

    one or more its natural frequencies. By using the MRE-based ATVA, the powertrain natural

    frequencies can be actively tuned either far away the excitation frequency or passed the excitation

    frequency rapidly as magnetic field speed rather than mechanical manners. Accordingly, global and

    local tuning methods were proposed for shifting powertrain frequency. Thus, the powertrain transient

    response could be reduced significantly. Numerical simulations of a powertrain system fitted with the

    ATVA are used to validate the ATVA proposed design for the transient stage. The obtained results

    show that when the ATVA is suitably located and properly controlled, the powertrain natural

    frequencies are shifted away the excitation frequency so that powertrain transient vibration response

    is significantly suppressed. Also, the effect of ATVA locations to its effectiveness is examined. The

    ATVA experiment testing will be our next work.

Authors


  •   Hoang, Nga (external author)
  •   Zhang, Nong (external author)
  •   Du, Haiping

Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • N. Hoang, N. Zhang & H. Du, "An adaptive tunable dynamic absorber using MREs for vehicle powertrain transient vibration control," in 15th Asia Pacific Automotive Engineering Conference, 2009, pp. 158-1-158-6.

Start Page


  • 158-1

End Page


  • 158-6

Abstract


  • This paper presents a concept design of Adaptive Tuned Vibration Absorber (ATVA) using

    a magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) for powertrain transient vibration reduction over a frequency

    range. The MRE material used to develop the ATVA is a soft MRE whose components are a rubbery

    silicone polymer matrix and ferrous fillers in fraction of 27.6% by volume. For such a soft MRE the

    elastic modulus significantly increases due to an external magnetic field. During the transient stage,

    the powertrain experiences a period of high level vibration because the engine speed passes through

    one or more its natural frequencies. By using the MRE-based ATVA, the powertrain natural

    frequencies can be actively tuned either far away the excitation frequency or passed the excitation

    frequency rapidly as magnetic field speed rather than mechanical manners. Accordingly, global and

    local tuning methods were proposed for shifting powertrain frequency. Thus, the powertrain transient

    response could be reduced significantly. Numerical simulations of a powertrain system fitted with the

    ATVA are used to validate the ATVA proposed design for the transient stage. The obtained results

    show that when the ATVA is suitably located and properly controlled, the powertrain natural

    frequencies are shifted away the excitation frequency so that powertrain transient vibration response

    is significantly suppressed. Also, the effect of ATVA locations to its effectiveness is examined. The

    ATVA experiment testing will be our next work.

Authors


  •   Hoang, Nga (external author)
  •   Zhang, Nong (external author)
  •   Du, Haiping

Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • N. Hoang, N. Zhang & H. Du, "An adaptive tunable dynamic absorber using MREs for vehicle powertrain transient vibration control," in 15th Asia Pacific Automotive Engineering Conference, 2009, pp. 158-1-158-6.

Start Page


  • 158-1

End Page


  • 158-6